Under30CEO » Entrepreneurship http://under30ceo.com Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.6 Under30CEO interviews successful young entrepreneurs to hear about their story and journey while starting their company. These young founders have over a million dollars a year in revenues and have been through many ups and downs to get there. These stories are meant to inspire, educate and motivate more young people to take a leap and do what they are passionate about. Under30CEO clean Under30CEO jared@under30ceo.com jared@under30ceo.com (Under30CEO) Under30CEO Interviews with Young Entrepreneurs on Starting Businesses entrepreneur, business, interview, young entrepreneur, business advice, startup advice, founder interview, ceo Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/u30logo300x250.png http://under30ceo.com/category/entrepreneurship-2/ 14 Reasons to Give Your Employees a Raise http://under30ceo.com/14-reasons-give-employees-raise/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=14-reasons-give-employees-raise http://under30ceo.com/14-reasons-give-employees-raise/#comments Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:00:00 +0000 theyec http://under30ceo.com/?p=39421 What was the determining factor that led to the last raise you gave to one of your employees? The following answers are provided by the Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched StartupCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that […]

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What was the determining factor that led to the last raise you gave to one of your employees?

raise

The following answers are provided by the Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched StartupCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses.

1. Value Creation

I give raises when someone exceeds my expectations, usually when employees take something on that wasn’t originally in their scope of work. I’ve had people ultimately create a position for themselves by making a suggestion, implementing it and taking ownership over it. Suddenly, the value they create for my business has gone up, and I feel it’s only fair to increase their compensation.
- Mark Krassner, Knee Walker Central

2. Accuracy and Timeliness

Having employees complete tasks consistently on time and with great accuracy is always a marker for me to give raises. Unfortunately, employees who get the job done are often overlooked in lieu of those who are overly political when, in fact, they are what makes the business progress day to day.
- Phil Chen, Givit

3. Willingness to Do More

We love employees who continually do more than they are asked or who are constantly looking for ways to help grow the business. Employees who have fresh ideas and aren’t afraid to take on the job of implementing new ideas are often awarded raises.
- Laura Land, Accessory Export, LLC

4. Confidence and Growth

If employees have the confidence to ask for the raise and the foresight to explain exactly how they will grow their skills to deserve the increase, I usually give it to them right there. In the most recent example of this happening, the employee asked for a raise far above his title. I laid out a three-month plan for the employee to prove his ability to work at that level; he did it in two.
- Brennan White, Watchtower

5. Independence

The last raise we gave to an employee was due to his success in operating more independently. We encourage our team to accomplish great things, and employees never need our permission to do so. Operating independently to accomplish things for themselves — and also for the team — is always rewarded and always appreciated.
- Parker Powers, Millionaire Network

6. My Beliefs

In my opinion, everybody you value should be getting regular raises to the extent you can afford it. If they’re not getting regular raises and you’re not providing some opportunity, employees could begin to question if you really value them. For me, I’d say the determining factor of the latest raise I gave was just my philosophical belief.
- Dan Price, Gravity Payments

7. Team Success

Our raises aren’t tied to the performance of the individual, but to the performance of the company as a whole. That’s, on the one hand, because when the company is doing better, we can afford it! On the other hand, it drills home the right incentives for team success.
- Derek Flanzraich, Greatist

8. Risking Value

I gave someone a raise to keep him so interested in my business that he would do anything to stick around. If you choose not to give employees raises, you risk losing them mentally, which will lead to losing them physically.
- John Rampton, Adogy

9. Good Attitude

Having the right attitude is the first step to getting real results that will lead to a raise.
- Alfredo Atanacio, Uassist.ME

10. Added Value

I look for the individual who is delivering results but also doing more than what is asked to drive value. That could be thinking outside of the box, building teams or answering problems our company is facing.
- Bobby Grajewski, Edison Nation Medical

11. Ability to Learn and Grow

In every weekly report, I ask employees for a suggestion to improve their role or the company. The great responses have saved money and boosted revenue through product improvements. One employee in particular had suggested many improvements with quantifiable results. She embodied our core values by continuously growing and learning in her role and also as a leader.
- David Hassell, 15Five

12. Responsibility

By taking ownership or seeing something that needs to be fixed, doing something about it and owning the results, employees show they’re transcending their job and thinking about what it takes to grow the company. They know they are accountable to the team, so they make good choices and follow through.
- Charlie Gilkey, Productive Flourishing

13. Initiative

Any employee who takes initiative to make the company better or more efficient needs to be rewarded. I have an employee who works hard to improve the company in several respects, and I’ve given him three raises this year when he did not expect any.
- Andrew Howlett, Rain

14. Preparedness

When my employee approached me, he had a very detailed list of all his accomplishments. He explained exactly how he helped the company be more profitable and that he was dedicated to our mission. It was an easy decision after that.
- Michael Quinn, Yellow Bridge Interactive

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5 Ways That a Leader Might Be Hurting the Teams Motivation http://under30ceo.com/5-ways-leader-might-hurting-teams-motivation/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-ways-leader-might-hurting-teams-motivation http://under30ceo.com/5-ways-leader-might-hurting-teams-motivation/#comments Wed, 23 Apr 2014 15:00:23 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=38836   Motivation is a tricky thing. It’s hard to start and get motivated, and it’s hard to sustain that motivation. To really keep motivated, you need a long-term plan. But even a good long-term plan can be sabotaged if you act the wrong way. When leading a team, motivation is key. You already know they […]

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 leader

Motivation is a tricky thing. It’s hard to start and get motivated, and it’s hard to sustain that motivation. To really keep motivated, you need a long-term plan. But even a good long-term plan can be sabotaged if you act the wrong way. When leading a team, motivation is key. You already know they can do the job and do it well, otherwise you wouldn’t have assigned the team in the first place. But getting them to do it, be proud of the work they put in, and get out, can be a challenge. What you may not realize is that you, the leader, may be sabotaging yourself and your team. It’s surprisingly easy to find yourself getting into bad habits. Fortunately, you can lead by example. Here are five ways to avoid hurting your team’s motivation, and why.

One: Using only monetary rewards.

Now let’s face it, there’s no substitute for good pay for a good job. But studies actually show that praise and commendation from leaders is even better at motivating employees than a raise. Think about this: people brag to their friends about a promotion faster than they’ll brag about a raise. That’s because a promotion is recognition of the hard work they’re putting in. If you make your employees feel appreciated, they’ll be loyal to you. Don’t accompany cold cash with a cold shoulder.

Two: Criticizing your team too much.

Part of being a good manager is knowing how much to manage and how much to let the members of your team do what they’re good at. As I just mentioned, you can go a long way by praising your team members. The converse is also true: criticize your team members and they’ll want to do less. If your team members are constantly anxious about doing the wrong thing and getting a tongue lashing, they will be less likely to stick their neck out. In a situation like that, they might just do the minimum to get by without you getting on their back, rather than give their best.

Three: Encouraging your team members to be unhealthy.

Without you realizing it, those candy bars in the break room might be your undoing. Studies show that exercise and good nutrition reduce anxiety, lead to better sleep, and positively affects your mood. These are all things you want from your team members. So how can you be preventing it? You might not even realize you’re doing it. You can give your team incentives to fitness by setting an example yourself and hitting the gym during lunch, by filling the break room with healthy snacks, and by allowing your team members to take needed breaks.

Four: Using Facebook to communicate.

Facebook can be a great tool, both personally and professionally. It’s probably also the biggest time sink in recent memory. At first, it may seem like a good idea to have a team use Facebook. You can set up groups, use Facebook Chat, and even keep in touch with your smartphone. Let’s make the generous assumption that your team is diligently avoiding angering birds or crushing candy. But that home screen is downright insidious, and on several levels. First, you’ve got those alerting red flags. That’s a distraction waiting to happen, and after all, what’s a minute or two, right? They get the job done. Well, here’s where the second layer comes in. What do you think your team is going to see on their Facebook homepage? They’ll see only the good parts of other people’s lives, rather than think about the tough slogs those people had to do to get there. It’ll lead to idle daydreaming, and at worst, a little resentment towards you because of the tough work they have ahead of them. So if you want to communicate, there are plenty of tools, from business SMS, to IM, to hosted PBX displays. Better yet, have them communicate face-to-face, rather than Facebook-to-Facebook.

Five: Make a promotion a zero-sum game.

Let’s say you have a competition for a coveted spot higher up the ladder. Your team members give it their all vying for the top spot. Then you have to drop the hammer to everyone that didn’t get the job. They’re going to feel like all their hard work was for nothing, and they’re going to resent you for it. It’s pretty likely that following such a situation, they won’t work as hard and they may even quit on you. If everyone works hard, reward everyone.

When leading a team, it’s important to be a team player. That means being able to put yourself in your team members’ shoes. Think about what it’s like to work for you, and try to be as honest with yourself as possible. Ask yourself “Would I want to work for me?” If the answer is no, then chances are, your team members are thinking it too, and they’re looking for the exit. If you want your team members to do their best, you have to motivate them the right way.

Reuben Yonatan is the founder and CEO of GetVoIP, an in-depth comparison guide of VoIP service. With an extensive background in internet startups, Reuben overseas all day to day operations including approval to editorials, content brainstorming, team recruitment & management, as well as managing all marketing campaigns with advertisers. Keep up with Reuben on Twitter @reubenyonatan.

Image Credit: Shutterstock.com

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What If You Took The Leap to LIVE BIG? http://under30ceo.com/took-leap-live-big/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=took-leap-live-big http://under30ceo.com/took-leap-live-big/#comments Wed, 23 Apr 2014 13:00:30 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=39101 What if….? It is a question that most young professionals ponder on a weekly and even daily basis. It is a question that far too often individuals will let sit on their conscience as it slowly manifests itself into a metaphorical ball and chain of excuses for not going out and experiencing the world as […]

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Under30Experiences Alaska

What if….?

It is a question that most young professionals ponder on a weekly and even daily basis.

It is a question that far too often individuals will let sit on their conscience as it slowly manifests itself into a metaphorical ball and chain of excuses for not going out and experiencing the world as it was meant to be.

I remember sitting at my desk a month ago contemplating the next team building exercise I could implement with my associates or a new action item I could generate to boost the efficiencies of my work area. I had hit a wall and I was tired of the monotony and the daily routine in the professional realm. I was in need of a new arena to express myself, to make my ideas and dreams a reality, to experience destinations and cultures through immersion rather than a tv screen or computer monitor.

So instead of asking myself “What If” I started asking myself “Why Not”.

Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “The purpose of life is to live it, to taste experience to the utmost, to reach out eagerly and without fear for newer and richer experience.”

When I travel, I don’t just want to see a glacier. I want to climb it.

I don’t just want to make out a volcano from a distance. I want to feel its heat as I scale it.

I don’t just want to catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights. I want to fall asleep under them.

So I decided to take the plunge and go to Alaska with Under30Experiences and create a journey outside of mass tourism.

Mass tourism has turned travel into a glorified sightseeing tour. One that caters toward feeding knowledge to you through an ear piece and a tour guide rather than putting you into a situation where you can experience a culture and be the source of your own information.

Through Under30Experiences you know that Machu Picchu is 7,970 ft. above sea level. At its summit you were short of breath not just from the picturesque landscape, but also from drawing thin air into your lungs while standing over a mile high into earth’s atmosphere. You know that Alyeska, Alaska receives, on average, 860 inches of snowfall a year because you fell face first into the 3 ft. of fresh powder that fell the night before. You know that Nicaragua is home to some of the most beautiful beaches on earth because it was in its waters where you learned to surf. You know that Costa Rica’s rainforest has five layers to it because you saw each one below you as you zip lined across its treetops.

Bali

U30X brings new meaning to the phrase “been there, done that” because after you have experienced even one of these trips you can truthfully speak those words where as many travelers accomplished the first part but fell short on the second.  I firmly believe that every morning you have two choices: continue to sleep with your dreams, or wake up and chase them.

U30X quite literally is a vessel to accomplish the latter. It brings together young adults likeminded in their adventurousness, but diverse in many other aspects and turns their dreams, ideas, and willingness to live life to the fullest into a reality. It has redefined forever the way young professionals will travel by fostering the idea that experience lies in action. It comes from doing instead of seeing. My life and the lives of the individuals on these trips will not stand in monotony, they will not be grayed out by the daily grind of a 9-5 job, and our worth years from now will not be measured monetarily but instead will be found in the experiences and memories of a life well lived.

Under30Experiences provides the opportunity for every individual who seeks to have an effect on the world rather than stand affected by it who aspires to do instead of see who longs to live instead of exist.

Nicaragua

 

Don’t be the person that saw the world, be the person who experienced it. So drop every fear, take every chance, and live big!

Stephen Skolnik is a Under30Experiences Ski Alaska Alumni and spends his days as a design liaison engineer with BMW Manufacturing Co. in Greenville, SC, and his free time embracing people and adventures that challenge and broaden his world.  Passionate about self-improvement, he is an aspiring motivator and seeks to drive others out of their comfort zones & toward their dreams.  Find Stephen on Linkedin here.

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More Than Just a Title: Becoming a CEO http://under30ceo.com/just-title-becoming-ceo/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=just-title-becoming-ceo http://under30ceo.com/just-title-becoming-ceo/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:00:18 +0000 GuestAuthor http://under30ceo.com/?p=39138 When I started my company, I became CEO by default. I had no idea what a CEO really did, but I was the one in charge, so the title fell to me. Needless to say, I wasn’t performing my duties well. Since then, I’ve learned that being the CEO doesn’t just mean signing checks and […]

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CEO

When I started my company, I became CEO by default. I had no idea what a CEO really did, but I was the one in charge, so the title fell to me. Needless to say, I wasn’t performing my duties well.

Since then, I’ve learned that being the CEO doesn’t just mean signing checks and giving the final stamp of approval on projects. Your day-to-day tasks will vary depending on your field, but if you want to learn how to be a great leader at a young age, do what any experienced CEO does.

1. Never Stop Improving

This is especially important for young leaders, but it will remain relevant the rest of your career. Here are some ways to ensure that you will continuously improve:

  • Be a sponge. Remain open to new ideas and feedback — even if it’s negative. Make fewer statements, and ask lots of questions instead. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. You’re going to make mistakes, but the key is to avoid making them twice.
  • Build a solid network of support. Be hyperaware of your strengths and weaknesses. Spend time maximizing your strengths, and fill the void left by your weaknesses through new hires, contractors, mentors, or advisors.
  • Push yourself to learn. Attend conferences, take online courses, set up an accountability group, and read new books. You may think you know your industry inside and out, but the answers to a groundbreaking change or new market potential can be found in learning something new.
  • Start writing. As a young CEO, you have tons of ideas and reflections swirling around in your head, and it wears on you to keep them all bottled up. Writing and sharing will help you work through thoughts and solicit great feedback.

2. Over-Communicate

Communication is where most CEOs fail. I’m not talking about giving speeches or wowing the board of directors with a terrific presentation. That type of communication is great, but it’s not critical.

Honest, open, clear communication with employees, co-founders, partners, clients, vendors, and even your competition will make or break you. Those who follow these criteria to communicate easily and often will stand out from the crowd:

  • Set clear expectations with employees, clients, and customers. Do this through several mediums so there’s no question that everyone understands what you expect.
  • Conduct one-on-ones with your team. Don’t just do this in the beginning; make it a continuous practice. Pull employees aside, sit down, and talk for 10 minutes. Ask what challenges and hurdles they face, how you can help, and what suggestions they have for improving the company.
  • Don’t assume directions were clearly understood. And don’t assume that someone feels the same way as you. Go above and beyond to ensure that everyone is on the same page, even when people don’t speak up.

3. Set a Good Example

Managers and bosses often have a vision of how they want their employees to work and act, but they fail to demonstrate those expectations. Leading by example applies to everything from answering the phone to dealing with angry clients or a failing product. If you don’t follow your own rules, employees will be confused. Here are some tips for making it work:

  • Don’t overindulge in your privileges. Sure, you could delegate the hardest projects, but it’s better to demonstrate the work ethic you expect to see from your employees.
  • Give positive feedback. When someone successfully models your example, let him or her know. It’s easy to say, “Nice work” or “Thanks for taking that extra step.” Your voice is the loudest in your company, and your encouragement will go a long way.
  • Communicate when you set a bad example. You will make mistakes that you don’t want copied, so call yourself out and make it clear that your actions were not up to par. The same goes for employees, but speak to them privately. Don’t call them out in front of the team and humiliate them.

4. Optimize Your Resources

CEOs know that there’s always more that can be done. This doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy your success, but you can’t rest on your laurels, either. When things are running smoothly, don’t ignore your business — improve it.

  • Know your key metrics. Work with an accountant or financial advisor to make sure you really understand your key metrics. Think of them as your company’s vital signs, and always watch them.
  • Understand what makes your business tick. Speak with your advisors and other leaders to determine where you can make changes and what is untouchable.
  • Never stop asking, “How can we do better?” Ask your team, your mentors, your customers, and anyone else your organization interacts with. Never assume that what you are currently doing is as good as it can be.

Any ambitious person with an idea for a business can be a CEO, but a title on a business card doesn’t make you a leader. It’s what you do every day and how you lead your team that determines whether you deserve to be CEO. Take a step back, evaluate yourself, and work to improve your business and become a better role model for your employees.

John T. Meyer is the co-founder and CEO of Lemonly, a visual marketing firm that specializes in infographics and data visualization. Always sweet, never sour, its mission is to create understanding through visuals. Connect with John on Twitter and Google+.

Image Credit: Shutterstock.com

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Not a People Person? Career Options for the Talented Introverts http://under30ceo.com/people-person-career-options-talented-introverts/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=people-person-career-options-talented-introverts http://under30ceo.com/people-person-career-options-talented-introverts/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 15:00:00 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=39012   Are you one of those people who really enjoy their “me time?” Does the thought of having to be around a lot of people and socialize completely stress you out? Does it worry you that once you get a job you will constantly have to be interacting with people? Well, it is time for […]

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introvert 

Are you one of those people who really enjoy their “me time?” Does the thought of having to be around a lot of people and socialize completely stress you out? Does it worry you that once you get a job you will constantly have to be interacting with people? Well, it is time for you to stop worrying. There are plenty of career options for introverts, where interaction with people is very little or none. Here are a few:

Writers

The very job of a writer requires immense concentration and peace of mind which is impossible to get if you are constantly being distracted by people. It is possibly the most solitary of all jobs. So, if you are in introvert, you would absolutely love it!

Apart from the occasional book signings (and that too, only if you get super famous), writers have no one to interact with except for their editors and publicists. These interactions are limited to sending in drafts of their work and perhaps exchanging a few comments now and then. Writers of short stories, poetry, blogs, etc. will also find themselves in a similar situation.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that writers can earn more than $68,000 a year1. With such a fat salary and no one to bother you while you work, I don’t know why we aren’t all writers!

Computer Programmers

For those introverts who are tech savvy and enjoy playing around with html codes, perhaps a career in computer programming will be best suited for you. Computer programmers only need to make use of one tool – their computer. There is no requirement for interaction, as long as you can excel in what you do. The extent of your interaction will be sending the code to your employer and this obviously doesn’t need to be done in person.

An added bonus to pursuing a career in computer programming is the pay. The average annual earning of a computer programmer is over $74,000.  Yes, that’s right. Don’t believe me? Check out the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. You must bear in mind however, that this figure will differ from employer to employer.

Medical Transcriptionists

Medical transcription is another great field for you if you like to work alone. A medical transcriptionist spends his entire work shift looking at data, processing the data and handling files. You don’t always have to work in a hospital or any medical institution. Once you build a network you will have a good clientele and you can then choose to work from home where your face time with people will be almost zero.

To speed up your network building, it is a good idea to complete a medical transcription course from an institution that is accredited by the AAPC or that have courses and programs approved by AHIMA.

Work-from-home medical transcriptionists are their own boss. They get to choose their own clients and manage their own workloads. And best of all, they decide when and with whom to interact.

I know what you are thinking – forget the transcription talk and tell me how much I will make in a year! Well, if you choose this as a career, the average annual medical transcriptionist salary is a little over $34,000, according to CareerStep.

I know it isn’t as much as a writer or a programmer’s salary but if this is where your interest lies, then by all means go for it.

Accountants

This is perhaps the only “office environment” type job that doesn’t require so much face time with colleagues and clients. An accountant is only concerned with one thing – the accounts. He spends his days working with numbers and organizing payments and rarely needs to interact with people or even attend meetings.

How much does and accountant make you ask? The answer is – a lot. An accountant would make $71,000 a year on an average. So if you have a flair for numbers, an accountant’s position may be right up your alley.

The best way to go is to try and match your interests and your skills with all the options out there. You can be assured that if it is something you love to do you will be more than satisfied with your job. And who knows, if you ease into it, maybe one day you may turn into a people person!

Frida has been working as a career guidance counselor for about 12 years. She’s stayed on top of growing industry trends through market research and interaction with young students and working professional alike. Her hobbies include swimming, meditation and music. She believes that everyone can enjoy a lucrative career by paying close attention to their passions and aptitudes. Of late, Frida has been focused on researching work-from-home opportunities for stay-at-home moms or professionals who would like to supplement their income. Frida is a suburban single mom and has 3 children.

Resources

1. http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes273043.htm

2. http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-transcriptionists.htm

3. http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes132011.htm

Image Credit: http://e.fastcompany.net/

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#EntrepreneurProblems: 6 Ways to Stay Healthy on the Road http://under30ceo.com/entrepreneurproblems-6-ways-stay-healthy-road/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=entrepreneurproblems-6-ways-stay-healthy-road http://under30ceo.com/entrepreneurproblems-6-ways-stay-healthy-road/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 13:00:00 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=38995   When I was younger, I always thought it would be so cool to be one of those career women who are always traveling from state to state for meetings, conferences, shows or any professional gatherings. Now that I’ve become one of those traveling career ladies, I still think it’s “cool” to see a lot […]

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 hotel gym

When I was younger, I always thought it would be so cool to be one of those career women who are always traveling from state to state for meetings, conferences, shows or any professional gatherings.

Now that I’ve become one of those traveling career ladies, I still think it’s “cool” to see a lot of places, but I’ve also realized it’s hard to stay healthy when you’re always on the road.

A lot of your meetings are based around food, like dinner meetings or networking luncheons. And the effort of traveling and busy schedule makes it hard to squeeze in a workout.

But the reality is, staying healthy on the road is critical to your work performance. I know if I don’t workout or if I eat unhealthily, I’ll be slower, groggy and not be on top of my game.

Here are some tips I’ve found that help me keep my health in check while traveling:

1- Bring snacks

Don’t wait until your dinner meeting to eat. It’s better to eat little snacks throughout the day to keep your metabolism up and you won’t feel so hungry at dinner. My favorite snack that keeps me full is Luna Protein Bars (the cookie dough flavor, duh). Other good options are almonds or anything with protein that will coat your stomach. I also bring oatmeal packs so I get my fiber in the morning!

2- Use AthleticMindedTraveler.com

This site is a great resource to find hotels with the best gyms or pools. Or finding healthy restaurants or running paths near your hotel. Basically, it’s your go-to tool for healthy options in hundreds of different cities. It’s $19.95 per year, but definitely worth it if you’re a traveler.

3- Stay at a Westin Hotel

Westin Hotels now offer New Balance gear to borrow. For me, I try to pack light and it’s hard to make room for my sneakers and workout gear. Therefore, rentals are a lifesaver. Westin also offers complimentary group runs. Need I say more?

4- Bring a resistance band

If you’re really crunched for time and can’t hit the gym, at least do some resistance band training for 10-20 minutes after you wake up. Resistance bands are easy to pack and have a ton of different exercises you can do with them. The Xfinity Fitness Band ($30 at sportsauthority.com) comes with workout DVDs. If you really want to get in some good resistance training (and are willing to pay $200), get TRX bands (trxtraining.com) that hook onto a doorway. They’re pricy but you’ll feel it in muscles you didn’t know you had!

5- Get a guest pass to a gym

Most gyms offer some sort of guest pass for a day or a week depending on the gym. Some are free and some are a small fee (like $5-10). Usually hotel gyms are limited, so try to get to a real gym on your trip. Don’t waste your time just on the elliptical for an hour, get in some weights and interval training to wake up your metabolism.

6- Don’t beat yourself up

Relax. It’s very hard to stick 100% to your normal fitness and meal plan while on the road. If you get mad at yourself for eating that cookie at the luncheon, you’re only going to put yourself in a bad mood and lose focus of your professional goals (which is the reason for the trip in the first place, right?). Talk to yourself like you’d talk to your good friend. Don’t raise your voice, breathe in breathe out, and make healthy choices at the next opportunity. Also remember that indulging in your cravings can be a good thing. If you want a cookie, eat one and be done! Depriving yourself of cravings can lead to binging. More importantly, you deserve to treat yourself in moderation. So go for it!

Jess Ekstrom is the 22-year-old founder of Headbands of Hope . For every headband purchased, one is given to a girl with cancer and $1 is donated to the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. Jess is also a public speaker at speaker at CAMPUSPEAK and a start-up consultant. Check out Headbands of Hope on FacebookTwitter, Instagram (@headbandsofhope).

Image Credit: Shutterstock.com

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10 Ways to Thwart Copycats on the Web http://under30ceo.com/10-ways-thwart-copycats-web/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=10-ways-thwart-copycats-web http://under30ceo.com/10-ways-thwart-copycats-web/#comments Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:00:38 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=38983   If you use the internet for marketing, advertising, sharing information, and completing business transactions, you know how important it is to have fresh, original content to catch the attention of potential shoppers and to increase your site’s popularity status. You probably spend quite a bit of time creating original content and you want others […]

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 content theft

If you use the internet for marketing, advertising, sharing information, and completing business transactions, you know how important it is to have fresh, original content to catch the attention of potential shoppers and to increase your site’s popularity status. You probably spend quite a bit of time creating original content and you want others to know who is behind the end product. While most people respect your authorship, there are others who may not. Content thieves or scrapers, take valuable personal information and steal the works of others without providing acknowledgement or giving the original author credit. These thieves are, at best, a headache for businesses who deal with them on a daily basis. At their worst, they can cause considerable damage to a business and its reputation.

What is meant by Content Misuse?

Content Misuse or theft is the act of taking small portions of written work from one website, such as a corporate homepage, social media site, blog, or electronic news article, and transporting it back to a website maintained by the content thieves. These cybercriminals take content from the websites of others by using sophisticated software that lets them bypass security gates to gain access to the targeted computer or network. From there, they freely take content and transport it to their own websites, where it may appear as original content.

Why Should You Be Concerned About Content Misuse?

Scraping has the potential to cause significant harm to businesses. Since written material that is taken from one site and reprinted on another appears without crediting the original author, people who see the material in both places do not know which of the two sites has the original content, and which has the copied material. Therefore, they may think that the content thieves are the original content creators, and that your site contains the duplicate information, which can damage you (or your company’s) credibility, trustworthiness, and reliability. As your squeaky clean business image becomes tarnished, customers and potential clients may quickly lose interest in your products and services, and they might start shopping elsewhere. This, over time, may result in a considerable loss of revenue and prevent your business from growing.

Protecting Yourself from Web Theft

To stop content thieves from wreaking havoc on your company’s credibility and reliability, it is important to take action against content misuse and theft. Here are ways to protect content on your website from scrapers:

1.     Post Copyright Notices:

Having copyright signs on your site lets thieves know you are aware of your legal rights and will defend them if necessary.

2.     Disable Hotlinks:

Content thieves often try to steal content using hotlinks. With this control method, hotlinks are disabled, and thieves are unable to transport material.

3.     Modify your RSS Feed:

Content thieves often steal material through RSS feeds. You can prevent this by posting a statement on your feed that says the material readers are seeing belongs to you.

4.     Use Watermarks:

Putting a watermark, like a brand or company logo, on your content, is a way to authenticate the data. You can add links so that any material removed from your site automatically links back to it.

5.     Use Plug-ins:

You can use plug-ins to stop unwanted intruders from accessing your site with copyright notices, fortified security measures, and other postings and warnings to deter thefts and alert others when that content has been stolen.

6.     Create Google Alerts:

Google Alerts is a valuable, simple, and user-friendly method of combating content theft. You can set up alerts using a specific keyword or phrase that is unique to your content. Google, in turn, will send you alerts if your material appears elsewhere.

7.     Claim Ownership:

With Google Authorship, your authentic material always appears with a unique trademark, icon, or image. Others will know content has been stolen when it appears without this attachment.

8.     Shrink-Wrapping:

Shrink wrapping does not stop thieves from taking material from your site. It even lets them take images from your site and save it to theirs. When they open their files, however, the original picture appears as something completely different.

9.     Slice and Dice:

This technique lets you dissect your photos, then use a table to turn the segments into a complete picture on your site. Thieves, when trying to take your photo, will have to download and save the individual segments.

10.  Monitor & Take Action:

Despite your best efforts, if your content has been stolen, you can take action to retrieve it. Programs like CopyScape, and Plagium let you know if your work has been taken while service like Scrapesentry helps you to monitor any such uneven traffic.

Content theft is a growing problem. Businesses and individuals risk having their content stolen from websites unless they take preventative action. Fortunately, there are ways that you can prevent this from happening to you with the help of copyright notices, plugins, and Google Alerts.

John Reiley is a tech enthusiast who loves being a part of the ever growing web community. He is a network specialist currently residing in US. John has a passion for writing articles and daily columns to serve his audience and educate them about the current technological advances.

Image Credit: Shutterstock.com

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Fuel The Desire To Win http://under30ceo.com/fuel-desire-win/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=fuel-desire-win http://under30ceo.com/fuel-desire-win/#comments Mon, 21 Apr 2014 15:00:30 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=39042 It’s easy to talk to look back and laugh at the tough times after a big win. But what about the time before you win or lose? The unsure moments when the days of the week become one big day and time hurtles by as the desire to win grows stronger. Finding footing during this […]

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winning

It’s easy to talk to look back and laugh at the tough times after a big win. But what about the time before you win or lose? The unsure moments when the days of the week become one big day and time hurtles by as the desire to win grows stronger.

Finding footing during this time can be tough and it’s easy to lose sight of what’s important. Everyday the headlines in the news outline a new acquisition or startup that has hit the big leagues. Daydreams then ensue that conjure up scenes of hitting the big leagues in your own life. But if you don’t take the first step or even push through the hurdle before you, in the end you will have nothing but dreams and massive regret.

Tap into the feeling that causes you to constantly fidget. Find your focus, trust your heart and give it everything you’ve got. When you jump out of bed in the morning, fear should cower away and say, “Uh oh, they’re awake again” and even fear the moment you sleep, for you it will be a moment where your desire can tap into your dreams and grow stronger.

Procrastinating within this moment is sure to put death to our progress quickly as does overworking and burning the candle at both ends. Without proper balance things can quickly get overwhelming. Within this balance is the fuel that the desire to win thrives and is best.

What’s your why?

Your why has to be deeper than you. It has to go beyond what you simply want. It burns from the wax of providing comfort to a hurting soul as a result of your determination to solve a problem as an entrepreneur. The desire should have you willing to go the extra mile even when it feels like you can’t.

Every bone in your body should be screaming at you to go after it like your life depends on it. Discovering your why begins with your outlook. You can’t expect thinking once about your vision will cover you till it all comes to fruition. This is something that has to be done every waking moment. It should be kept as a song in your heart, fueling the passion to be better, to create more good and be the driving force to see that you succeed.

It’s about giving you closure and answering the question of what if we often face.

Own your moment of clarity.

One step, and one block at a time and soon you’ll have built something amazing. Each repetition over the course of time will get you where you need to be. In this moment keep your eyes on the ball. Focus on the lane you’re in.

The more good habits you have = the better the desire to win.

Practice waking up feeling like a conqueror, even on the days it may feel like the complete opposite. Deny the desire to hit snooze. This is your moment to shine. Apps like Lift allow you to stay encouraged and allow you to gather good habits.

Focus on your health.

It’s easy to go an entire day without eating when you’re locked in the zone. The only way to keep your desire to win in perfect shape is to actively take time for a proper diet and exercise. Don’t have a full hour for a workout? No excuse, even 10 minutes spread out over 3 times a day gives you 30 minutes. Perhaps even a smoothie around the time you begin to feel sluggish will help you not only now but in the future as well.

Prepare for the next day the night before. Skip that next episode and invest in your future by preparing lunch and what you’ll wear for the next day. It will go great distances in helping you feel relaxed and more prepared to take on the day.

Your future self will thank you dearly.

Take time out to care

Don’t be that person that is always absorbed into a piece of technology at every moment of the day. Invest less time in finding the perfect shot to post on the latest social network and instead invest time into the relationships around you.

The mistake that prohibits the desire to win to run at its utmost best is to neglect the friends and family around you that care, and want to see you succeed just as badly as you want to.

Wanting to win isn’t just about today, but also the benefits or consequences of our actions today.

Onward be your cry, and forward be your steps. Now is the time to fuel your desire to win.

David Yarde is a Founding Partner of Sevenality, a branding firm focused on building better community based businesses, by business owners share their brand story. You can connect with him on twitter.

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Why I Wrote A Check To The Nazis For $1,000 (Trust Me, There’s a Good Reason) http://under30ceo.com/wrote-check-nazis-1000-trust-theres-good-reason/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=wrote-check-nazis-1000-trust-theres-good-reason http://under30ceo.com/wrote-check-nazis-1000-trust-theres-good-reason/#comments Mon, 21 Apr 2014 13:00:07 +0000 danieldipiazza http://under30ceo.com/?p=39452   Wow. Never thought I’d type THAT title into the subject line of this post. Today, my friends, I wanted to give you some quick insight into a last resort strategy you can enact to finally get yourself to take action when other methods have failed. It’s very simple: Punishment. I’ve had an annoying psychological […]

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Wow. Never thought I’d type THAT title into the subject line of this post.

Today, my friends, I wanted to give you some quick insight into a last resort strategy you can enact to finally get yourself to take action when other methods have failed. It’s very simple:

Punishment.

I’ve had an annoying psychological barrier lurking in the background of my brain for 25 years. I call it the Wiggle Room Barrier. The Wiggle Room Barrier has me believe that approximates can be substituted for absolutes, then makes me underestimate the consequences for not hitting benchmarks I set for myself. It sounds a little something like this (various formats):

  • “It’s ok if I’m a LITTLE late. What’s 5 – (or insert much higher number) minutes between friends/coworkers/clients?”
  • “This person SAID they wanted this deliverable at X time, but if I got it to them at Y time, everything will still run smoothly”
  • “Officer, I understand. But I was only going 11 over. It’s basically the same.”

This barrier is very real. And it has real consequences. I’ve always known that it was something I needed to work on, but I’ve always been able to work AROUND it, not through it:

For instance, if I was late to class, I’d show up and do incredible, top 1% work. Teacher can’t be mad.

Or at work, I’d build such strong personal bonds that people would be forced to overlook my negative traits in the blinding glare of my awesome.

Or maybe I’m late for my training session at the gym. My excuse: I’m paying my trainer, he’s already getting my money. No big deal.

All of this, is of course, dreadfully wrong.

In the back of my mind, I’ve told myself that I’d continue to work on this weak point “when I have time.” But…umm…when has THAT phrase ever really helped us get something done?

As I get older, I realize that this is something that I need to handle now. I can blame it on my parents, or the fact that I’m still “young and learning (boo hoo)”, but in reality, I need to get this shit handled. Period.

Except I can’t FORCE myself to do it. I can’t WILL myself to be more accountable or show up at places on time. I’ve tried. If I have an hour to leave, I’ll look at Google maps, see that it only calculates 38 minutes of drive time, then leave at PRECISELY 38 minutes until I have to be in the meeting. Then I have the audacity to get mad at traffic. LOL. I’m funny.

So what’s the solution? Wallow in this? Let the habit take me down and overshadow my other good qualities? Not a chance.

Thank GOD the American Nazi Party is here to help.

I remember reading a post by AJ Jacobs a few months ago. AJ had an interesting suggestion for hacking your own stubbornness.

  • First: Identify a habit that you want to be accountable for.
  • Then, to get MASSIVE leverage on yourself, write a check to a charity you absolutely HATE — and give that check to an impartial 3rd party who will check in on you once a week.
  • (Make sure to pick someone that doesn’t care about your feelings.)
  • Have them call you 1x/week for 90 seconds. If you didn’t follow through on your end of the commitment (make them probe you), the check sends.
  • That’s it.

Here’s my check. I’m sending it to a masochistic friend in Canada today. I would rather burn myself alive than send this out. So I know I’ll be overcoming the Wiggle Room Barrier. Come to think of it, the Nazis would probably rather me burn alive as well.

 

photo

Note the memo. And I think the Superman print is despicably ironic.

 

Writing checks to people/charities you hate is one way to take massive action to change yourself. But it’s not the only way.

What’s one habit/trait that’s been KILLING you your whole life and needs MASSIVE action/consequences to change?

What action/consequences could you take/enact to change it. Get extreme here.

*******

PS – I share all my best insights/strategies on building online businesses and living a better life with my Tribe. Have you joined yet? It’s free - click here to join.

 

Parts of this post were originally published by Daniel DiPiazza at Rich20Something.com

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How to Make the Best Decisions for Your Startup http://under30ceo.com/make-best-decisions-startup/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=make-best-decisions-startup http://under30ceo.com/make-best-decisions-startup/#comments Sun, 20 Apr 2014 17:00:07 +0000 theyec http://under30ceo.com/?p=39330 I have unwittingly made some bad decisions in my 28 years on this earth, but every day I make better ones. Reflecting on this, it is clear that making the right calls, large and small, requires certain prerequisites and a thoughtful decision-making process. These considerations are especially important in a startup, where you will never […]

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Senior businessman thinking and making choice while looking up

I have unwittingly made some bad decisions in my 28 years on this earth, but every day I make better ones. Reflecting on this, it is clear that making the right calls, large and small, requires certain prerequisites and a thoughtful decision-making process. These considerations are especially important in a startup, where you will never have perfect information when making a decision.

The success or failure of your startup results from nothing more than the series of small, medium and large decisions that you act on?. Make more right decisions than wrong ones and your startup will be more likely to succeed. In my experience, the best startup decisions are the result of a carefully thought out process, as follows.

First, the Prerequisites

The conditions below must be met before you start the decision-making process. This is imperative, as most bad decisions are made inadvertently because some or all of these conditions are not met first.

  1. Follow your passions. For most world-class entrepreneurs, passion does not come primarily from the prospect of financial gain or personal notoriety; it comes from an innate desire to change the world. To make the right decisions for your startup, you must believe that if your startup succeeds, you will change the world in the ways you desire. The more your startup aligns with your passions, the more confident you will feel that you are making the right decisions for the right reasons.
  2. Embrace the reality. You have to be able to properly assess and accept reality. Smart entrepreneurs do not see the glass as half-full or half-empty; they see a glass with a certain amount of water. Then, they decide to drink the water, or fill up the glass with more water. To make the right decisions, you must first see things as they really are.
  3. Practice some balance. Your mind, body, and soul must be balanced before you can make good decisions. This is perhaps the most important prerequisite, and one that most entrepreneurs brazenly ignore. Startup culture encourages over-work and over-play; to be balanced you must also be mindful of your health and spiritual life, not just stimulating your mind.

The Decision-Making Process

Only after you know that the above prerequisites hold true, you can move on to the decision-making process. Below is the step-by-step process that works for me (inspiration), but you may follow a different process.

Let’s set up a scenario and walk through it. In our sample scenario, we are trying to figure out the primary customer type to market your startup’s solution to.

  1. Identify the decision. Clearly identify the single decision you want to make and do not let extraneous things fog it up. In the sample scenario, you might ask yourself, “Out of my entire market of potential customers, who is my startup’s one highest-revenue-generating customer?”
  2. Identify your options. Lay out the different options you have based on your own knowledge, keeping in mind the values that are important to your startup. In our example, you will now identify the different customer types that can generate revenue for your startup. And if we’re being realistic, you might eliminate certain customer types at this step as they are not feasible to reach.
  3. Gather information. Collect as much information as is pragmatic about your options. In our setup, you might research different customer segments to gain further insight into your startup’s market and reduce your blindness. Utilize emerging tools such as Clarity.fm to talk with the right experts and Compass.co to help put market data into the right context for your startup. After conducting research, you may end up eliminating a certain revenue-generating customer type, because it doesn’t match your startup’s vision or the context you are working within.
  4. Make and implement the decision. Finally, the fun part: You get to make a decision and act on it! The decision should incorporate the information you have gathered, your gut instinct and your startup’s vision. In our example, you would make a firm decision on which customer segment you will target and start marketing to that segment (the marketing strategies you use may be a separate decision).
  5. Evaluate the outcomes. Evaluate objectively if you made the right decision. Some questions you can ask in our sample scenario include: Is my startup solving a real need for this customer? How much revenue has been generated? Am I convinced that this was the right customer to target or should I target another customer? If you have balance in your life when thinking through such questions (i.e. your mental well-being is not solely dependent on startup success), you can make a proper evaluation. If you conclude you made the wrong decision, assure the prerequisites are really met and start over from step one.

In a startup, as in life, you will seldom have enough information to conclusively make the right decisions. To a certain extent, you have to rely on your gut instinct, especially as most decisions are interdependent (i.e. picking the highest revenue-generating customer may not lead to the most cost-effective marketing strategy).

When decision time comes, regardless of whether it is a small or a significant decision, make sure that you are passionate for the right reasons, thinking realistically, practicing balance in your life and following a thoughtful decision-making process. If you do these things, you will you make the right calls more often than not, and your startup will be better for it.

A version of this article originally appeared on Medium.

Naveed Lalani is the Founder and CEO of Portable Boutique Inc., a company that creates Plug & Play Bitcoin Widgets. Previously, Naveed was Chief Strategy Officer at DonorNation.org, and Co-Founder at Rally.org. Naveed gives back by advising the Thiel Fellowship and leading entrepreneurship initiatives at the Ismaili Professionals Network.

The Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched StartupCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses.

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