Under30CEO » Entrepreneurship http://under30ceo.com Mon, 21 Apr 2014 13:00:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.6 Under30CEO interviews successful young entrepreneurs to hear about their story and journey while starting their company. These young founders have over a million dollars a year in revenues and have been through many ups and downs to get there. These stories are meant to inspire, educate and motivate more young people to take a leap and do what they are passionate about. Under30CEO clean Under30CEO jared@under30ceo.com jared@under30ceo.com (Under30CEO) Under30CEO Interviews with Young Entrepreneurs on Starting Businesses entrepreneur, business, interview, young entrepreneur, business advice, startup advice, founder interview, ceo Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/u30logo300x250.png http://under30ceo.com/category/entrepreneurship-2/ Why I Wrote A Check To The Nazis For $1,000 (Trust Me, There’s a Good Reason) http://under30ceo.com/wrote-check-nazis-1000-trust-theres-good-reason/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=wrote-check-nazis-1000-trust-theres-good-reason http://under30ceo.com/wrote-check-nazis-1000-trust-theres-good-reason/#comments Mon, 21 Apr 2014 13:00:07 +0000 danieldipiazza http://under30ceo.com/?p=39452   Wow. Never thought I’d type THAT title into the subject line of this post. Today, my friends, I wanted to give you some quick insight into a last resort strategy you can enact to finally get yourself to take action when other methods have failed. It’s very simple: Punishment. I’ve had an annoying psychological […]

The post Why I Wrote A Check To The Nazis For $1,000 (Trust Me, There’s a Good Reason) appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>

 

Wow. Never thought I’d type THAT title into the subject line of this post.

Today, my friends, I wanted to give you some quick insight into a last resort strategy you can enact to finally get yourself to take action when other methods have failed. It’s very simple:

Punishment.

I’ve had an annoying psychological barrier lurking in the background of my brain for 25 years. I call it the Wiggle Room Barrier. The Wiggle Room Barrier has me believe that approximates can be substituted for absolutes, then makes me underestimate the consequences for not hitting benchmarks I set for myself. It sounds a little something like this (various formats):

  • “It’s ok if I’m a LITTLE late. What’s 5 – (or insert much higher number) minutes between friends/coworkers/clients?”
  • “This person SAID they wanted this deliverable at X time, but if I got it to them at Y time, everything will still run smoothly”
  • “Officer, I understand. But I was only going 11 over. It’s basically the same.”

This barrier is very real. And it has real consequences. I’ve always known that it was something I needed to work on, but I’ve always been able to work AROUND it, not through it:

For instance, if I was late to class, I’d show up and do incredible, top 1% work. Teacher can’t be mad.

Or at work, I’d build such strong personal bonds that people would be forced to overlook my negative traits in the blinding glare of my awesome.

Or maybe I’m late for my training session at the gym. My excuse: I’m paying my trainer, he’s already getting my money. No big deal.

All of this, is of course, dreadfully wrong.

In the back of my mind, I’ve told myself that I’d continue to work on this weak point “when I have time.” But…umm…when has THAT phrase ever really helped us get something done?

As I get older, I realize that this is something that I need to handle now. I can blame it on my parents, or the fact that I’m still “young and learning (boo hoo)”, but in reality, I need to get this shit handled. Period.

Except I can’t FORCE myself to do it. I can’t WILL myself to be more accountable or show up at places on time. I’ve tried. If I have an hour to leave, I’ll look at Google maps, see that it only calculates 38 minutes of drive time, then leave at PRECISELY 38 minutes until I have to be in the meeting. Then I have the audacity to get mad at traffic. LOL. I’m funny.

So what’s the solution? Wallow in this? Let the habit take me down and overshadow my other good qualities? Not a chance.

Thank GOD the American Nazi Party is here to help.

I remember reading a post by AJ Jacobs a few months ago. AJ had an interesting suggestion for hacking your own stubbornness.

  • First: Identify a habit that you want to be accountable for.
  • Then, to get MASSIVE leverage on yourself, write a check to a charity you absolutely HATE — and give that check to an impartial 3rd party who will check in on you once a week.
  • (Make sure to pick someone that doesn’t care about your feelings.)
  • Have them call you 1x/week for 90 seconds. If you didn’t follow through on your end of the commitment (make them probe you), the check sends.
  • That’s it.

Here’s my check. I’m sending it to a masochistic friend in Canada today. I would rather burn myself alive than send this out. So I know I’ll be overcoming the Wiggle Room Barrier. Come to think of it, the Nazis would probably rather me burn alive as well.

 

photo

Note the memo. And I think the Superman print is despicably ironic.

 

Writing checks to people/charities you hate is one way to take massive action to change yourself. But it’s not the only way.

What’s one habit/trait that’s been KILLING you your whole life and needs MASSIVE action/consequences to change?

What action/consequences could you take/enact to change it. Get extreme here.

*******

PS – I share all my best insights/strategies on building online businesses and living a better life with my Tribe. Have you joined yet? It’s free - click here to join.

 

Parts of this post were originally published by Daniel DiPiazza at Rich20Something.com

The post Why I Wrote A Check To The Nazis For $1,000 (Trust Me, There’s a Good Reason) appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/wrote-check-nazis-1000-trust-theres-good-reason/feed/ 0
How to Make the Best Decisions for Your Startup http://under30ceo.com/make-best-decisions-startup/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=make-best-decisions-startup http://under30ceo.com/make-best-decisions-startup/#comments Sun, 20 Apr 2014 17:00:07 +0000 theyec http://under30ceo.com/?p=39330 I have unwittingly made some bad decisions in my 28 years on this earth, but every day I make better ones. Reflecting on this, it is clear that making the right calls, large and small, requires certain prerequisites and a thoughtful decision-making process. These considerations are especially important in a startup, where you will never […]

The post How to Make the Best Decisions for Your Startup appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
Senior businessman thinking and making choice while looking up

I have unwittingly made some bad decisions in my 28 years on this earth, but every day I make better ones. Reflecting on this, it is clear that making the right calls, large and small, requires certain prerequisites and a thoughtful decision-making process. These considerations are especially important in a startup, where you will never have perfect information when making a decision.

The success or failure of your startup results from nothing more than the series of small, medium and large decisions that you act on?. Make more right decisions than wrong ones and your startup will be more likely to succeed. In my experience, the best startup decisions are the result of a carefully thought out process, as follows.

First, the Prerequisites

The conditions below must be met before you start the decision-making process. This is imperative, as most bad decisions are made inadvertently because some or all of these conditions are not met first.

  1. Follow your passions. For most world-class entrepreneurs, passion does not come primarily from the prospect of financial gain or personal notoriety; it comes from an innate desire to change the world. To make the right decisions for your startup, you must believe that if your startup succeeds, you will change the world in the ways you desire. The more your startup aligns with your passions, the more confident you will feel that you are making the right decisions for the right reasons.
  2. Embrace the reality. You have to be able to properly assess and accept reality. Smart entrepreneurs do not see the glass as half-full or half-empty; they see a glass with a certain amount of water. Then, they decide to drink the water, or fill up the glass with more water. To make the right decisions, you must first see things as they really are.
  3. Practice some balance. Your mind, body, and soul must be balanced before you can make good decisions. This is perhaps the most important prerequisite, and one that most entrepreneurs brazenly ignore. Startup culture encourages over-work and over-play; to be balanced you must also be mindful of your health and spiritual life, not just stimulating your mind.

The Decision-Making Process

Only after you know that the above prerequisites hold true, you can move on to the decision-making process. Below is the step-by-step process that works for me (inspiration), but you may follow a different process.

Let’s set up a scenario and walk through it. In our sample scenario, we are trying to figure out the primary customer type to market your startup’s solution to.

  1. Identify the decision. Clearly identify the single decision you want to make and do not let extraneous things fog it up. In the sample scenario, you might ask yourself, “Out of my entire market of potential customers, who is my startup’s one highest-revenue-generating customer?”
  2. Identify your options. Lay out the different options you have based on your own knowledge, keeping in mind the values that are important to your startup. In our example, you will now identify the different customer types that can generate revenue for your startup. And if we’re being realistic, you might eliminate certain customer types at this step as they are not feasible to reach.
  3. Gather information. Collect as much information as is pragmatic about your options. In our setup, you might research different customer segments to gain further insight into your startup’s market and reduce your blindness. Utilize emerging tools such as Clarity.fm to talk with the right experts and Compass.co to help put market data into the right context for your startup. After conducting research, you may end up eliminating a certain revenue-generating customer type, because it doesn’t match your startup’s vision or the context you are working within.
  4. Make and implement the decision. Finally, the fun part: You get to make a decision and act on it! The decision should incorporate the information you have gathered, your gut instinct and your startup’s vision. In our example, you would make a firm decision on which customer segment you will target and start marketing to that segment (the marketing strategies you use may be a separate decision).
  5. Evaluate the outcomes. Evaluate objectively if you made the right decision. Some questions you can ask in our sample scenario include: Is my startup solving a real need for this customer? How much revenue has been generated? Am I convinced that this was the right customer to target or should I target another customer? If you have balance in your life when thinking through such questions (i.e. your mental well-being is not solely dependent on startup success), you can make a proper evaluation. If you conclude you made the wrong decision, assure the prerequisites are really met and start over from step one.

In a startup, as in life, you will seldom have enough information to conclusively make the right decisions. To a certain extent, you have to rely on your gut instinct, especially as most decisions are interdependent (i.e. picking the highest revenue-generating customer may not lead to the most cost-effective marketing strategy).

When decision time comes, regardless of whether it is a small or a significant decision, make sure that you are passionate for the right reasons, thinking realistically, practicing balance in your life and following a thoughtful decision-making process. If you do these things, you will you make the right calls more often than not, and your startup will be better for it.

A version of this article originally appeared on Medium.

Naveed Lalani is the Founder and CEO of Portable Boutique Inc., a company that creates Plug & Play Bitcoin Widgets. Previously, Naveed was Chief Strategy Officer at DonorNation.org, and Co-Founder at Rally.org. Naveed gives back by advising the Thiel Fellowship and leading entrepreneurship initiatives at the Ismaili Professionals Network.

The Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched StartupCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses.

The post How to Make the Best Decisions for Your Startup appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/make-best-decisions-startup/feed/ 1
5 Pivotal Rules of Starting a Business http://under30ceo.com/5-pivotal-rules-starting-business/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-pivotal-rules-starting-business http://under30ceo.com/5-pivotal-rules-starting-business/#comments Sat, 19 Apr 2014 15:00:43 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=38975 Building a startup company is something that one can not understand until trying to do it.  It is painful, arduous and at times seems absolutely impossible.  Yet at the same time, it can be one of the most exciting and rewarding things one can ever take on in their life. As a serial entrepreneur, I […]

The post 5 Pivotal Rules of Starting a Business appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>

Building a startup company is something that one can not understand until trying to do it.  It is painful, arduous and at times seems absolutely impossible.  Yet at the same time, it can be one of the most exciting and rewarding things one can ever take on in their life.

As a serial entrepreneur, I have learned both from experiences and inspiring people who have taught me what it takes to succeed in business and grow as a person.

The five pivotal rules of starting a business are:

Fail.

failure-defeats-losers1

~Robert T. Kiyosaki

I am positive that my failures are my most valuable assets.  I have never met a person with great success that does not point to the importance of their failures.  It is near impossible to succeed without making mistakes, experiencing disappointment, being defeated, and being knocked to the ground.

What differentiates an ordinary man from a great one is the great one takes failure as an opportunity to get back  their feet, try again and become better the next time around.  Failure is a chance to learn what it takes to be successful in business and as a person.

Your failures will make you bigger, better, smarter, and more successful than you were before.  Just like General George Patton said, “Success is how high you bounce after you hit bottom.”

Understand your market and competition.

Starting a business is a huge risk financially, mentally and emotionally.  You can mitigate this risk by understanding your market and competition.  You should know them both better than you know yourself.  Who are your customers?  Who are the players in your industry?  How will you differentiate yourself?  Constantly ask yourself these questions and always discover more about both your market and competition.

Only associate with smart, loving, supportive and actionable people.

oprah quote

I used to have over 800 contacts in my phone.  I now have under 80.  I came to realize that it is a waste of time and emotions to deal with people who don’t care, who don’t answer their phones,  who tell you that your ideas are bad and that you will not succeed.

I only now associate with people who love me, care about me, support me and are willing to help.  It is also very important for me to have close relationships with people who are extremely smart, successful and will do anything in their power to ensure my success.  I like to call these people actionable.

I always say that I only wish to talk to people who I know are willing to fly halfway around the world for me.  (Flying any further than halfway would be inefficient).  I am willing to do the same for these people as well.  Together you will share in each other’s success but more importantly help one another when times are tough.

These people should also all be smarter than you.  These people will help you answer the questions you do not know and help you to solve difficult problems you have never faced before.  These people will give you the wisdom needed to succeed.

“Try never to be the smartest person in the room. And if you are, I suggest you invite smarter people … or find a different room.” -Michael Dell

Ask for money when you need advice, ask for advice when you need money.

I have always been one to ask others for advice.

I often get advice from people whom I already know, and also reach out to inspiring people who I have never met.  When asking someone for advice, it can be flattering for that person.  More often than not, they are excited to share their knowledge, experiences, failures and successes.  It is important to keep these people in the loop as you move forward in your career and always show your appreciation for their advice.  (I always write hand written thank you notes).  It is from these people that I gain wisdom which helps me in everything that I do.

These people will be the first ones to take the opportunity to help you when you need them.  They will be your mentors, advisers and investors.

Don’t do it for the money or glamour, do it because you have no choice

quote-Walt-Disney-disneyland-is-a-work-of-love-we-1090

Stories of start up companies being acquired and having an IPO come out every single day.  At this point, founders of companies often become extremely wealthy.  The chances of this happening are very low.  Starting a business is not a great way to get rich, working in finance is a much safer bet.  The idea of working for yourself and answering no one and becoming filthy rich are not reasons to start a company.

Entrepreneurship must run in your blood  You must have a passion to execute your own idea, because you want to disrupt markets, and make the world a better place.  You must be prepared to take on a massive amount of responsibility.  You will be working around the clock for your investors, employee’s livelihood, and most importantly your customer.  “Follow your passion, not your paycheck. The money will come eventually.” – Anonymous

Do it because you want every day to be an adventure.  Do it because are not afraid to fail.  Do it because for your astute passion for your company.  Do it because you simply have no other choice.

Believe

“I believe in the light that shines and will never die.  Oh I believe the fire burns, we stay alive.  They will talk about us, like they talked about the kings before us.”

~Common

Have faith that you will succeed.  Believe in your company, your customer and those working to help you succeed.  Most importantly; believe in yourself.

Jeremy W. Crane is a serial entrepreneur from Rochester, New York and attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the founder of StadiumPark, a mobile payment app for stadium and arena parking. He is most passionate about his friends and family, especially his brothers Dan and Ari. Follow him @jeremywcrane

Image Credit: inspower.com

The post 5 Pivotal Rules of Starting a Business appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/5-pivotal-rules-starting-business/feed/ 0
What Separates the Men From the Boys http://under30ceo.com/separates-men-boys/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=separates-men-boys http://under30ceo.com/separates-men-boys/#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 17:00:43 +0000 Fueled http://under30ceo.com/?p=39387 When it comes to choosing whom to work with in business, there’s a huge difference between choosing to partner with a small startup versus a large Fortune 500 corporation. Both have their own merits and it really depends on what the end result is meant to be. Check out our list of what really separates […]

The post What Separates the Men From the Boys appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>

success

When it comes to choosing whom to work with in business, there’s a huge difference between choosing to partner with a small startup versus a large Fortune 500 corporation.

Both have their own merits and it really depends on what the end result is meant to be.

Check out our list of what really separates the little guys from the big corporate companies below.

Decision Making Speed

In a small startup, decisions can be made quickly because there’s less people chiming in with their opinions. Not to mention, moving fast is what startups are all about. The successful ones manage to make a big splash because they’re more flexible in comparison to their more well-established counterparts. Fortune 500 companies have endless levels of management that need to be gone through before a decision can be reached. Staying competitive isn’t easy when decisions from potential partnerships could take over a week.

Risk

Attitudes towards risk are all across the board between startups and Fortune 500 companies. Startups tend to embrace risk because they are normally in a fast-growth stage, whereas large corporations are more averse to risk and looking to keep their already stable revenue channels safe. The saying “if it ain’t broke, why fix it?” rings true in this situation.

Resource Allocation

If there’s one place where more established companies have it over startups, it’s resource allocation. Every cent counts at a startup because resources are scarce and allocated based on where they will be needed most. Sometimes these decisions are also made quickly because there may not be enough time to ponder on certain financial decisions. In a Fortune 500 company, resources are plentiful and can be allocated more freely. This has slowed since the recession though.

Processes

There is no doubt that processes are documented in one place or another at Fortune 500 companies. In startups, processes are not always top priority so recording how things are done is put on the backburner. Pressure ends up being placed on individuals who do know how to action processes and procedures. This is not an ideal situation for any company, especially should those individuals get sick or leave.

Innovation

Startups have the ability to quickly adapt to new ideas, allowing them to rapidly innovate when necessary as we mentioned when talking about risk. Large businesses, on the other hand, are slow to adapt to new ideas. While they aren’t opposed to innovation, the time it takes to implement new things can sometimes lead it to being obsolete. Startups also tend to devote a large portion of their time to coming up with fresh concepts. This seems to not hold true with Fortune 500 companies, as they tend to work off of services that they have been providing for a long time.

Working with a startup is fun, ideas are fresh and everything is fast paced. But it’s also stressful and there are long hours involved.

Working with a Fortune 500 company provides stability and security, but things are slow to happen which can be frustrating.

When it comes to deciding whom you want to partner with, bear all of the above in mind. Here at Fueled, we work with both types of companies, but love the fast pace of partnering with a startup.

Written by the editors at Fueled.  We develop iPhone and Android apps.

Image Credit: tweakyourbiz.com

The post What Separates the Men From the Boys appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/separates-men-boys/feed/ 1
5 Reasons Why All Entrepreneurs Should be Bilingual http://under30ceo.com/5-reasons-entrepreneurs-bilingual/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-reasons-entrepreneurs-bilingual http://under30ceo.com/5-reasons-entrepreneurs-bilingual/#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 15:00:14 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=38771 To become a successful entrepreneur, you need lots of initiative and you must be ready to take risks. No entrepreneur can expect to achieve his or her goals without risks and initiative, even in a country like the U.S. where entrepreneurs and small businesses are become more and more common every year. In a report […]

The post 5 Reasons Why All Entrepreneurs Should be Bilingual appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>

bilingual entrepreneurs

To become a successful entrepreneur, you need lots of initiative and you must be ready to take risks. No entrepreneur can expect to achieve his or her goals without risks and initiative, even in a country like the U.S. where entrepreneurs and small businesses are become more and more common every year.

In a report published by Forbes Magazine, six years worth of data based on small businesses in the U.S. (small business in the U.S. are defined by the SBA as companies which employ fewer than 500 employees)

reveals that there are now almost 28 million small businesses in the U.S. Over 22 million of these small businesses are self employed and operate with no additional payroll or employees, commonly referred to in the business world as “nonemployers”. Over 50% of the working population work for/own small businesses and small businesses have generated over 65% of net new jobs in the U.S. since 1995. What’s even more interesting is that roughly 52% of all small businesses are home-based and about 75% of all U.S. businesses have “non-employer” businesses status.

Considering the importance of small businesses and entrepreneurs in the U.S., it’s about time more attention was paid to the benefits of language learning. The world is becoming smaller by the day. International communications are easier than ever before. All entrepreneurs in the U.S. must learn at least one other language to remain successful in any industry throughout the years to come.

1. Globalization places heavy emphasis on language learning

Incredible advancements in technology have made international business very, very easy. The majority of entrepreneurs don’t even need an office from which to work these days. A laptop, a quiet corner in the house and a PayPal account are the bare minimum basics that anyone needs to launch a new business idea in any country in the world without having to physically be in that country.

However, if you plan to outsource company needs to other countries, if you plan to make deals with business partners in other countries and if you intend to market your product to consumers in other countries, learning a foreign language will be incredibly useful. In fact, sometimes entrepreneurs find that they want to sell their products within their native countries but that even then they need to be able to communicate with consumers who speak foreign languages.

Globalization has made entrepreneurship a viable and attractive option for many people with small business ideas, but it has also placed a heavy demand on our bilingual skills.

2. Entrepreneurs need social skills, not just business know-how

Being a successful entrepreneur is not just about being experienced in business and knowing a lot about your business’ industry. Successful entrepreneurs must also possess incredibly effective social skills. Being bilingual opens the doors to prospective clients, deals and opportunities because it enables us to be more sociable with the business partners/consumers/employers we have in mind to work with.

The benefits of being fluent, or even just being able to converse, in more than one language are numerous. Being bilingual doesn’t just help entrepreneurs to get ahead via professional opportunities. Being bilingual helps entrepreneurs achieve success by understanding foreign cultures, foreign markets and foreign workforces on a much more personal and social level.

3. Bilingual entrepreneurs can be more creative

Entrepreneurs with bilingual skills can also gain the upper-hand in business because they are able to be doubly-creative with their ideas. As globalization continues to strengthen, more people travel, more people live and work abroad or work for foreign companies from home. Cultures mix, more children are born in bilingual households and the need to develop bilingual products and to provide bilingual services steadily increases.

The world needs bilingual products, bilingual services, bilingual materials and bilingual advice. Entrepreneurs with language skills can better tap in to the needs of this growing, globalized community that entrepreneurs who can only speak their native language. Take a look at the plans of this bilingual entrepreneur who is hoping to develop a sophisticated language learning iPad app for young children born into bilingual households.

As another prime example of bilingual creativity, pupils from Cynffig Comprehensive School in Kenfig Hill, near Bridgend in Wales, have developed a bilingual board game for Welsh Baccalaureate learners studying economic and technological change. The board game isn’t considered to be innovative just because it’s a board game. The innovation comes from the bilingual nature of the game and how its bilingual status appeals to the needs of students studying at present in today’s multilingual world.

4. Eligibility for bilingual grant schemes

There are a number of grant schemes only available to bilingual entrepreneurs. These schemes help small businesses finance their ideas in the first few years and it appears that lots of additional help is being awarded to bilingual entrepreneurs. The Multicultural Entrepreneurial Institute is one of those organizations in the U.S. willing to offer US$3000 grants to the most innovative bilingual entrepreneurs out there.

Almost all small business ideas need financial backing, particularly in the early stages. Becoming a bilingual entrepreneur can only broaden the possibilities you have at your fingertips.

5. Foreign entrepreneurs making a success of things in the U.S.

Geoffrey Wescott and David Griffith published an interesting report on the effect of language acquisition on income among Latino entrepreneurs in the U.S. The report highlights the relationship between language skills and annual income within the Latino community and reveals how Latin American entrepreneurs based in the U.S. who are “bilingual in Spanish and English with strong English skills, earn more on average as entrepreneurs than as employees.”

The report also confirms that Latin Americans who emigrate to the U.S. have “shown a propensity to become self-employed and hold skills that often lead to success in the entrepreneurial market,” but that their “income as entrepreneurs is lower than other ethnic groups,” when they’re not bilingual in English.

Whatever way you look at it, bilingual entrepreneurs in the U.S., both natives and foreign immigrants, need to take a strong interest in language learning and make being bilingual high on their list of priorities. Being bilingual is vital to all entrepreneurs who want to remain in a competitive position within their respective industries.

Tracey Chandler represents Language Trainers, which provides individually-tailored language training on a one-on-one or small group basis worldwide.

Image Credit: Shutterstock.com

The post 5 Reasons Why All Entrepreneurs Should be Bilingual appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/5-reasons-entrepreneurs-bilingual/feed/ 0
What To Do When You Fall Out Of Love http://under30ceo.com/fall-love/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=fall-love http://under30ceo.com/fall-love/#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 13:00:12 +0000 danieldipiazza http://under30ceo.com/?p=39456 I can still remember what it felt like to tell my first girlfriend, “I don’t love you anymore.” I’d just gotten back from traveling through Greece and the Middle East (read my adventures) and I thought I was such a worldly, cultured man now. I thought I needed to explore the world and see if […]

The post What To Do When You Fall Out Of Love appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>

I can still remember what it felt like to tell my first girlfriend, “I don’t love you anymore.”

I’d just gotten back from traveling through Greece and the Middle East (read my adventures) and I thought I was such a worldly, cultured man now.

I thought I needed to explore the world and see if there was anyone “better” out there. But the truth was pretty simple: I’d known before I left that we were going to break up. That’s why I filled an empty iPhone 3G case full of Trojans.

Because…you know…what if they didn’t sell condoms in Greece? That was a scumbag move, I know.

Incidentally, Greece actually has one of the highest abortion rates in the world and an entire spring festival devoted to the phallus - so I may have been on to something inadvertently.

199_543885477031_6314_n

It’s not actually that color. But the size is more or less accurate.

See, about 6-8 months before that trip, I’d just stopped feeling that “spark” for her. I couldn’t really place a reason on why.

But as soon as I realized it, my subconscious mind started looking for a solution to my “problem.” And, out of the clear blue sky, I got the genius idea to study abroad. It was classic psychological avoidance — and it was a way for me to blame the problems in our relationship on something other than my lack of attention to her needs.

5 years later, the situation feels a lot cleaner in my mind and my decisions seem much more deliberate in retrospect.

As I look back on my choices, starting with the roots of how I arrived at my decisions, I can see the fatal flaw:

I thought that I’d “fallen out of love.” I WAS WRONG.

In reality, my mind was just going through the natural transitions that EVERYBODY goes through when they do ANYTHING for an extended period of time. It’s evolution, disguised as boredom.

This idea of evolution-as-boredom came rushing back to me tonight — while I was at the gym bench pressing…of all places.

WHY?

Because I fucking hate the gym now — AND THIS IS A BIG DEAL SINCE I USED TO BE MARRIED TO THE IRON.

DSCN1475

Most of you don’t know that I very nearly became a pro natural bodybuilder at 19. In college, I even filmed a 10-minute documentary called Skin Deep on the psychological aspects of the sport — and how bodybuilding had affected my relationships. I think it has over 1,400 views now.

But now, I don’t get nearly the same thrill out of the gym that I used to.

I’d been feeling like this for a while, and honestly, it bothered me.

“Have I fallen out of love with the gym, too?”

FOCK! Shit shit shit. DAMMIT! I need this body. It’s my ultimate backup if all my businesses fail. I’ll just call my mom, have her shave my inner thighs again (see above pic) and I should be back in business at Swinging Richard’s.

I need to stay in shape. But at the same time, I just don’t care about being “jacked” like I used to. So every day (or 4-5x/week), I’d force myself to go in there, I’d do some stuff and I get out. I still stayed in great shape because of the foundation I’ve built over the years — but it didn’t feel the same anymore — and I was pretty sure that at the earliest opportunity, I’d find some excuse to cut corners.

In 2-3 years I’d be the hairy guy on the bosu ball saying things like “tone” and “core”.

JUSTKILLMENOW.

Luckily, none of that has happened. And it won’t — because I’ve taken proactive measures.

The secret: Months ago, I hired a personal trainer.

Now, I realize that my feelings towards the gym weren’t boredom. Just like my first relationship, I was going through an evolution.

And that’s the insight: After several years of doing something — it won’t feel the same anymore. No matter how intense the feeling was in the beginning, inevitably, that feeling will transform.

When that happens, you’ll think you’ve “fallen out of love.”

So what how do you get the intense feelings back and encourage yourself to push forward? Here are 2 strategies to get you moving again:

Strategy 1:  Get someone to help you push

Rather than assume that the gym will never be as exciting as it used to be and get complacent with lower levels of performance — I hired a trainer to add that spark back. It was a bit of an ego blow at first because I feel like I’m supposed to have the gym thing “under control.” But the truth is, for the first time in quite a while, I’m actually able to work out with the blistering intensity I used to. And it’s ONLY because I’ve acknowledged that I can’t do it alone anymore. Now I feel the intensity again. I’m back in love.

What if you could find someone to help you get your most important tasks done?

  • Someone to remind you to write every day
  • Someone to run with you or check in with you about your eating
  • Someone to ask you “have you practiced your programming today?”

It makes a BIG difference having someone on your team, pushing you forward.

(Side note: My friend Maneesh wrote a great article on exactly how to find an accountability buddy here.)

Strategy 2:  Realize that even the best things change

How many of us have been disappointed when our relationships stopped feeling “fresh”?

We met somebody and the chemistry was undeniable. We thought it would always feel like the first date.

So how do we deal when it doesn’t anymore?

In my current relationship, rather than “falling out of love” when that “new-new” feeling wears off, I continually find fun, interesting ways to explore the relationship on a deeper level that’s only possible because of how close we’ve grown. I’ve come to realize that as we grow, the way we see each other will continually change. And this is ok. This is normal. When that happens, it’s your responsibility to find new, exciting ways to look at your relationship.

(BTW – as corny as it sounds, the 5 Love Languages is a great book for figuring this type of stuff out.)

This isn’t just about romantic relationships. It also applies to other relationships with things you love.

Maybe you used to love playing the guitar — but it doesn’t interest you like it used to anymore. Have you tried learning a different style or getting a new guitar? Have you tried learning to read sheet music instead of tab, or performing for people?

*******

These are just a few examples from my life — I hope they resonated with you.

Can you think of a time when you “fell out of love” with something you used to be passionate about?

What did you do to get the passion back? Or did you just let it slowly slip away…

Let me know in the comments.

*******

PS – I share all my best insights/strategies on building online businesses and living a better life with my Tribe. Have you joined yet? It’s free – click here to join.

Parts of this post were originally published by Daniel DiPiazza at Rich20Something.com

The post What To Do When You Fall Out Of Love appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/fall-love/feed/ 0
Best Meetups in NYC http://under30ceo.com/best-meetups-nyc/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=best-meetups-nyc http://under30ceo.com/best-meetups-nyc/#comments Thu, 17 Apr 2014 17:00:43 +0000 Fueled http://under30ceo.com/?p=39394 Don’t be scared of meeting complete strangers because they might be just the people you need to meet. Why? Well, for one, you get to see what cool new things people with similar interests to you are doing. From getting to attend cool seminars to meeting potential leaders in your field, you’ll find so many […]

The post Best Meetups in NYC appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>

NY Tech Meetup

Don’t be scared of meeting complete strangers because they might be just the people you need to meet.

Why? Well, for one, you get to see what cool new things people with similar interests to you are doing. From getting to attend cool seminars to meeting potential leaders in your field, you’ll find so many opportunities here. Clearly, meetups are the place to be.

We, at Fueled, found some of the best meetups in NYC. Ready to go?

NY Tech Meetup

NY Tech Meetup was founded in 2004 by Meetup’s founder Scott Heiferman and became an independent nonprofit in 2010. Boasting 32,000 members, their aim is to connect members of the tech community so they can help each other create successful and sustainable companies. They provide resources and work with policy makers to develop policies that are beneficial to all. They aim to foster innovation with cutting edge ideas and new technology.

They are best known for their monthly demo nights, where up to 10 chosen companies have a chance to showcase what they do at the Skirball Theatre.

TechCrunch’s New York Meetup

TechCrunch’s New York Meetup features a pitch-off event where entrepreneurs have a chance to wow the judges there in less than 60 seconds. And they give out free beer, what’s cooler than that?

The pitch-off generally last for an hour, then afters interviews the participants. Next, the winners are announced and a networking event follows. This year it’ll be hosted at the Santos Party House on Lafayette.

If you want to participate in the pitch-off, your products must be in private or stealth beta. The first place winner gets a table at in the Start Up Alley during TechCrunch’s Disrupt NY event.

The Hatchery

This event is perfect if you’re a business that’s just starting out and would like to attract more investors, as well as get some valuable feedback from various experts. The people behind The Hatchery understood when they started the company that entrepreneurs might not have the connections they need to draw in investors or people to fund their project. In turn, investors who are interested in putting money into startups might not even have access or know about the countless companies that are looking for funding.

The Hatchery does, what they call, the Gauntlet where entrepreneurs are given seven minutes to present their business models to different investors. After that, there is a panel that holds a Q&A session.

NYC Data Science

Though a relatively new, NYC Data Science is gaining a lot of attention. This group prides itself on continuously building a community of super smart and talented individuals. NYC Data Science was created as a space to display what data scientists were working on and help them meet one another.

The meetup welcomes anyone in the tech community, including software engineers, hackers, statisticians, and data scientists. They have different events, ranging from novice to advanced. The aim is to give members new ideas, tools, and concepts in order to help them solve whatever conundrum they may be facing.

Advocates for this meetup include Hilary Mason, John Myles White, Jake Porway, and Drew Conway. Some similar meetups, if you can’t make this one, include DataKind and DataGotham.

By Ilan Nass

Written by the editors at Fueled.  We develop iPhone and Android apps.

Image Credit: thenextweb.com

The post Best Meetups in NYC appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/best-meetups-nyc/feed/ 0
How Climbing to the Top Put Life In Perspective http://under30ceo.com/climbing-top-put-life-perspective/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=climbing-top-put-life-perspective http://under30ceo.com/climbing-top-put-life-perspective/#comments Thu, 17 Apr 2014 13:00:39 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=38979 No, I’m not talking about the top of the success ladder (still climbing), but rather the top of Las Vegas’ most scenic rock reserves. Around mid-March, a close friend and myself went to Red Rock Canyon, a national conservation area in Las Vegas. One word: beautiful! At Red Rock, you’ll find different trails from easy […]

The post How Climbing to the Top Put Life In Perspective appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>

No, I’m not talking about the top of the success ladder (still climbing), but rather the top of Las Vegas’ most scenic rock reserves. Around mid-March, a close friend and myself went to Red Rock Canyon, a national conservation area in Las Vegas. One word: beautiful!

At Red Rock, you’ll find different trails from easy to moderate to strenuous in order to get to different focal points at the top. The entire experience put life, both personal and professional, into perspective.

Red Rock

Choosing Your Path

We arrived at the reserve, received a map (“our life plan”) and it was up to us to decide the trail we wanted to take. We took one of the moderate (more like semi-strenuous) trails and we knew we would work collectively to get to the top. In choosing our path, we understood that it wasn’t a trail we could take alone; we knew that we wanted a trail that would challenge us.

Whether personally or professionally, there are choices to be made; choices that will dictate your life path. In everything you do, from relationships to career to financial investments, the choices you make should always be about improving yourself. Improvement and growth rise out of challenges.

Getting Lost

Have you ever gone on a hike with no signs and didn’t get lost? Probably not. We made some wrong turns, meaning we had to turn back around, stop and find the more sensible route. When we were nearing the end, it was very questionable if we were even still on our trail or not. But, we kept going. We had some reassurance from those coming down from the top saying, “you’re going the right way” and “you’re almost there.”

In spite of getting lost, we made it to the top. That came from persistence and perseverance. You may have a business venture that took a wrong turn, but that doesn’t mean it is the end of your business. It just means you need to re-work your plan, seek out advice along the way and push to see that venture through. You never know how lives can be changed from your idea.

Red Rock 2

Find Joy in the Journey

Hiking to the top with the sun out and being dressed in all black (genius) isn’t an easy task, but I would do it over and over. The entire experience from deciding our path to getting lost was so worthwhile. The good, bad and ugly all happen to build character, mold excellent students of life and create forward-thinking entrepreneurs. So with everything, find joy in the journey.

Natasha J. Benjamin is a two-time founder of a digital public relations consultancy and a performing arts nonprofit. When she’s not building brands in the PR sphere or focusing on school communities through the arts, she is blending media and culture through her penned thoughts. Natasha loves to connect with new people, so tweet with her here: @natashajoleen

The post How Climbing to the Top Put Life In Perspective appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/climbing-top-put-life-perspective/feed/ 0
Tension: The Silent Epidemic That’s Killing Your Company http://under30ceo.com/tension-silent-epidemic-thats-killing-company/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tension-silent-epidemic-thats-killing-company http://under30ceo.com/tension-silent-epidemic-thats-killing-company/#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 15:00:54 +0000 GuestAuthor http://under30ceo.com/?p=38759 Did you hear the one about the stressed-out business executive who walked into the doctor’s office complaining about terrible nightmares? “It’s awful,” the exec tells his doctor. “Some nights, I imagine I’m a teepee facing incredibly strong winds, rain, and snow. I’m all alone on the edge of a cliff.” The exec continues, “Other times, […]

The post Tension: The Silent Epidemic That’s Killing Your Company appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>

tension

Did you hear the one about the stressed-out business executive who walked into the doctor’s office complaining about terrible nightmares?

“It’s awful,” the exec tells his doctor. “Some nights, I imagine I’m a teepee facing incredibly strong winds, rain, and snow. I’m all alone on the edge of a cliff.”

The exec continues, “Other times, I’m not a teepee, but a wigwam that’s about to get destroyed by a raging wildfire.” Then, he finally pleads, “I just don’t know what to do anymore, doc. Can you please help me?”

At this point, the doctor leans back and calmly replies, “The problem is that you need to learn how to relax. Clearly, you’re just two tents.”

Get it? No? Well, maybe you’re “too tense.”

But seriously, the problem of tension in the workplace has been around for generations, and it’s not going to disappear any time soon.

Any sociologist will tell you that when you gather a group of individuals together in the same place — each with their own beliefs, ambitions, talents, and insecurities — there’s bound to be some friction. Here are four common causes of workplace tension:

1. Timing Is Everything (Early Birds vs. Night Owls)

The time that co-workers spend in the office often becomes a source of animosity among employees. Here, perceptions become reality. Workers and managers who arrive before other employees and then leave right at 5 p.m. may be perceived as not pulling their weight. The same can be said for late workers who are seen as slackers for “coming in whenever they want.”

2. King of the Mountain (Co-worker vs. Co-worker)

Another common source of tension in organizations comes from power struggles between employees. These range from co-workers competing for the same promotion to those fighting for the opportunity to lead the same project to even those gunning for their boss’ job.

3. Who Gets the Credit? (Leadership vs. Team)

When employees feel like they’re not appreciated or recognized for contributing to the success of the company, their confidence in their own abilities often declines — while their distrust of management increases. Managers who routinely take credit for their teams’ successes often face difficulties motivating employees down the road. This self-serving management style can quickly destroy morale and lead to product or service quality issues.

4. The Battle of Us and Them (HR vs. Employees)

Although HR employees are generally perceived as the peacekeepers of an organization, they can sometimes be the root cause of a dysfunctional work environment. For example, tensions can rise if HR suddenly institutes cookie-cutter policies or changes procedures.

Is It Malice or Miscommunication?

In a very small number of cases, I encountered a corporate framework that was intentionally developed to create an atmosphere that encouraged internal competition, subtle and overt clashes, and ongoing confrontation between employees. These were generally hyper-aggressive, sales-driven businesses with high employee turnover and very little management support.

More often, tensions and feelings of mistrust fester and grow in organizations not as a result of some specific action or directive, but when company policies are ambiguous, outdated, or rarely enforced.

To establish a constructive working environment, business leaders and managers throughout the organization must provide a clear set of expectations for their employees. These should be consistent with the overall goals and objectives of the company.

Employees won’t follow the rules if they don’t understand them or if they feel like they’re counterproductive to achieving their own personal success.

Tension Is Everywhere — Deal With It

No matter the size or age of your company, the simple truth is that some amount of tension in the workplace is unavoidable.

We’re all human, and humans are far from perfect when working well with others. Look around: Do you see any of your employees singing, “I love you. You love me. We’re a happy family,” all day long? Probably not. And that’s OK.

The truth is that most companies can and do operate successfully somewhere in the middle.

Don’t Fight It — Direct It

The most important thing for managers and company executives to do is to first accept that tensions between employees will always be a part of an organization’s culture.

With this in mind, company leaders must be on the lookout for potential flashpoints within the organization and then take immediate action to diffuse those situations when they arise.

Moving forward, it’s important to create an atmosphere of trust and mutual respect by developing a progressive corporate structure. Establishing workflow, reporting processes, and channels of communication to limit the number of uncomfortable situations that occur in the first place is also an important step.

Forming, Storming, Norming, and Performing

A model that I have successfully used for many years to help enhance team performance in organizations is a process that psychologist Bruce Tuckman first penned in his 1965 article, “Developmental Sequence in Small Groups.”

In the article, Tuckman outlined a process where members of a group achieve success by forming, storming, norming, and performing the necessary steps to complete the task at hand efficiently and with minimal friction within the group.

The key is to communicate a very clear set of objectives at the beginning of the task and allow the group to work through smaller issues as they come up.

When employees understand that they’re all working toward the same goal and will receive the same rewards as every other employee, they realize that more can be accomplished in a shorter amount of time when everyone works together.

And that’s no joke.

Ambrose Conroy is the founder of Seraph, as well as a member of its executive team. Seraph works with clients to transform, relocate, or restructure their business operations. Seraph consultants bring experience in exploiting emerging markets, wringing profit from troubled operations, and accelerating product development.  Ambrose is a hands-on management consultant and corporate problem solver who regularly works with leading international companies in the automotive, aerospace, energy infrastructure, and medical technology/device sectors. 

Image Credit: Shutterstock.com

The post Tension: The Silent Epidemic That’s Killing Your Company appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/tension-silent-epidemic-thats-killing-company/feed/ 1
5 Humbling Life Lessons I Am Learning Living In Costa Rica http://under30ceo.com/5-humbling-life-lessons-learning-living-costa-rica/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-humbling-life-lessons-learning-living-costa-rica http://under30ceo.com/5-humbling-life-lessons-learning-living-costa-rica/#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 13:00:16 +0000 Under30CEO http://under30ceo.com/?p=39437 I packed my shit up and I left. Just like that. It didn’t take much planning. I booked a plane ticket and hoped on a plane, Costa Rica bound. When I arrived it hit me in the face. My big city girl’s ego was too big for the place. After 20+ years of life in Paris […]

The post 5 Humbling Life Lessons I Am Learning Living In Costa Rica appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>

I packed my shit up and I left.

Just like that.

It didn’t take much planning. I booked a plane ticket and hoped on a plane, Costa Rica bound.

When I arrived it hit me in the face. My big city girl’s ego was too big for the place. After 20+ years of life in Paris and six in New York, some serious adjustments needed to be made.

costa rica

 Here is what life has been teaching me since I’ve arrived in paradise:

1. “All we know, is that we know nothing.” Aristotle

I arrived in Costa Rica thinking that I had nothing to learn from this place. My thought process was basically something along these lines: “What can be possibly so extraordinary here? I speak Spanish and I’ve been to Mexico, I think I know what this is all about.”

Huge ego-check.

Nothing here is like what I’ve experienced before. Out of fear I had convinced myself that nothing could surprise me anymore. But being immersed in a country and a culture completely foreign to you is all about opening your mind and admitting that you don’t know.

No assuming.

No guessing.

No comparing.

Just learning to experience everything.

2. The people who care won’t care.

The people who truly and deeply love you from a genuine and unconditional place will always support you no matter what your endeavors are.

They won’t hold you back; they will push you away with a smile. They will want the best for you and they’ll accept you for who you are.

These people are rare and the best way to add more of them into your life is to be one of them yourself.  Give people the support and positivity they need to grow and make their own leaps of faith.

3. Life is not limited to what you can see right now.

This morning I saw four baby monkeys playing in the tree in front of my house. Then, two iguanas walked by. The wind blew in the palm trees. I took a deep breath and I thought how disconnected we are in our big city lifestyle… we worry so much all the time about useless stuff and we forget about the world out there.

Life is not limited to what you can see right now. There’s a whole world out there waiting for you to discover it. And I know that deep inside you know that you’re not on this planet to meet deadlines or sit behind a desk all day.

4. To travel light, you must be willing to detach from what you are clinging onto.

It doesn’t matter where you are in the world, peace will always come from within.

Don’t think you have to quit your job and jump on the next plane to Brazil to find serenity. Relocating might help but know that wherever you go, you bring your emotional baggage with you. To travel light, you must be willing to let go, detach from what you are clinging onto. Know that when you are far away from home grudges, deep insecurities and unhealed wounds might show up to the surface for you to release them and move forward.

5. Life is pure.

If you ask a Costa Rican what’s up? He or she will probably respond, “Pura Vida” (Pure Life) with a huge smile.

When you get close to nature, life becomes pure. When you remove all the conditioning society empresses upon you to keep you small, you expand. When you’re not worried about where the cool spot to be seen is, no fancy car to drive, no designer clothes to wear and no 9 to 5 to show up to, all of a sudden your attention shifts on what truly matters: the beauty and purity of life as it is.

Garance Clos is an Integrative Life Coach and Yoga Teacher. Get your free De-stress Manual: 5 Easy Instructions to Build the Relaxed Life You Want.  

The post 5 Humbling Life Lessons I Am Learning Living In Costa Rica appeared first on Under30CEO.

]]>
http://under30ceo.com/5-humbling-life-lessons-learning-living-costa-rica/feed/ 0