Results: Gen Y's View on the #OccupyWallStreet Movement : Under30CEO Results: Gen Y's View on the #OccupyWallStreet Movement : Under30CEO
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Results: Gen Y’s View on the #OccupyWallStreet Movement

| October 30, 2011 | 6 Comments

occupy wall street

Last week we ran a poll to see what our readers thought of the Occupy Wall Street movement. The poll saw over 250 votes come in and the results are posted below.

It seems like there is a pretty even split with 38% agreeing with the movement and 33% disagreeing with it. The movement has gained followers from across the globe and continues to stand strong months after it began. While their message of corporate greed and corruption directly impacts young people entering today’s business world they have also been criticized for not having enough clear goals on how to change things.

One thing that can be pointed out is the poll does not look at if someone disagrees with the idea of the movement or disagrees with how this particular movement is doing things and addressing the problem.

What are your thoughts on the results? Why do you think the numbers came out this way?

38% I agree with the movement

33% I disagree with the movement

19% I need to learn more

10% I don’t care about the movement

About the Author: Jared O'Toole

Co-founder and editor of Under30Media. You can send an email to Jared(at)Under30CEO.com. Follow him on Google+ or @JaredOToole

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  • Sherry Lowry

    I agree with the Occupy Wallstreet movement concept, but not necessarily with the specifics around the implementation or approach to this. It seems to me the most important statement is “no more business as usual” — including in how we elect, fund, or oversee political politicians who actually APPROVE legally what Wallstreet practices become.

    We have a seriously dysfunctional corporate, government and political system. All are incredibly, and incestuously entertwined and we must begin with unraveling how these relationships harm the future of America.

    As for the future, we are substantially dependent now on Gen-Y’ers to state an emphatic NO to further participation in these broken practices and systems. They hold the future in their hands and I’m all for identifying those in this generation who have leadership capability, and there are many, and putting full weight and resource behind them.

    We’ve repeatedly sold out their future up until now with what we have allowed to be legalized and it is up to the rest of us to take the stands to change this. I’m 72 yrs, actively full-time in business, have a 5-generation team, 2 sons (Gen-X & late Boomer) and 2 grandboys ages 11 and 8. I’d really like them all to have the chances to thrive as Americans in the business endeavors and lifestyle of their choices as we have had ourselves – up until now.

  • Curtis Szajkovics

    Personally I’m not a fan of this movement. Yes, I’m in the 99%, I’m getting out of college this December, don’t have a job lined up and I have no clue how I’m going to pay back my loans. But I’m confident I will find a way, be it starting my own business or working at Starbucks.

    Blaming everyone who has money and then wrapping it all up under the cover of “corporate greed” just feels un-American to me. It looks to me like the movement assumes that if you have more money than anyone else, you must have gotten it by short handing another person.

    This is just my view as an on looker. Personally I have never thought of protests as an effective way to get anything accomplished. More often than not they simply come across as people complaining in the streets for things they themselves cannot accomplish and therefore no one else should be allowed to either. Before I get flamed for that, I know that the movement is supposed to be about the business practices of big business, and the political system that allows it to operate. But it seems that the message is lost in news reports of protesters being arrested for, of all things, refusing to leave parks after dark. I don’t care what you claim the symbolism is about you occupying public land and what not. This might be effective if you were trying to do away with the “park closes after sundown” law, but it just looks childish while trying to force political and business reform.

    My biggest fear is that the movement makes it un-acceptable to reach a certain level of success in business while lumping entrepreneurs and successful big business in with those who are achieving success with bad business practices. I’m not saying I have a better solution, but it is just something I hope the movement, and politicians who will draft the laws in response to the movement understand.

    I do however hope that this brings to light a much deeper need for political reform in how things are accomplished in Washington and state/city governments everywhere. I do not feel you can place all the blame on businessmen who take advantage of the world in which they operate, we are entrepreneurs, learning to work WITH the obstacles is WHAT WE DO. Maybe in the future our political prospects will more closely represent the people and not the political parties which all have their own agenda. If this movement helps us toward that end goal then it will be worthwhile.

  • http://spiritsentient.com JasonFonceca

    I wrote an article about this for Technorati :)

    The basic thrust of it was:

    “Occupy Wall Street’s heart is in the right place, but most of their creative energy + solution-power is very, very misplaced.”If this idea intrigues you, check it out here: http://spiritsentient.com/hey-occupy-wall-street-change-yourselves

  • http://spiritsentient.com JasonFonceca

    I wrote an article about this for Technorati :)

    The basic thrust of it was:

    “Occupy Wall Street’s heart is in the right place, but most of their creative energy + solution-power is very, very misplaced.”If this idea intrigues you, check it out here: http://spiritsentient.com/hey-occupy-wall-street-change-yourselves

  • http://twitter.com/WrightAaronM Aaron Wright

    I just graduated from college last year, and have over $40K in debt. I work at a bookstore for minimum wage, but plan to launch a website later this month. With that said, I’ll say that I do not agree with the movement. I feel that the movement is a perfect example of how Americans want everything to be given to them. The Occupy Wall street crowd has brought this on themselves. They brought the wealth gap on themselves by depending on employers and the government to take care of them, thereby putting those groups into power. They brought it on themselves by spending money they didn’t have on things they didn’t need.

    The solution to the wealth gap is not to sit out on the street protesting; I fail to see how that will help anyone. Instead, the solution is to encourage entrepreneurship and financial intelligence. Our high schools should teach people the skills they need to start businesses and take charge of their own financial future.

    By encouraging small business growth, we accomplish 2 things. First, those who go off to start a business are removed from the job market, creating less competition for those who choose to job search. Second, we create more businesses, which in turn leads to more jobs for the job seekers. It decreases competition for jobs by lessening demand and increasing supply. That is the solution to the wealth gap, not protesting.

  • http://twitter.com/WrightAaronM Aaron Wright

    I just graduated from college last year, and have over $40K in debt. I work at a bookstore for minimum wage, but plan to launch a website later this month. With that said, I’ll say that I do not agree with the movement. I feel that the movement is a perfect example of how Americans want everything to be given to them. The Occupy Wall street crowd has brought this on themselves. They brought the wealth gap on themselves by depending on employers and the government to take care of them, thereby putting those groups into power. They brought it on themselves by spending money they didn’t have on things they didn’t need.

    The solution to the wealth gap is not to sit out on the street protesting; I fail to see how that will help anyone. Instead, the solution is to encourage entrepreneurship and financial intelligence. Our high schools should teach people the skills they need to start businesses and take charge of their own financial future.

    By encouraging small business growth, we accomplish 2 things. First, those who go off to start a business are removed from the job market, creating less competition for those who choose to job search. Second, we create more businesses, which in turn leads to more jobs for the job seekers. It decreases competition for jobs by lessening demand and increasing supply. That is the solution to the wealth gap, not protesting.