Why We’re Happy to Consider Apple a Competitor : Under30CEO Why We’re Happy to Consider Apple a Competitor : Under30CEO
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Why We’re Happy to Consider Apple a Competitor

| May 18, 2012 | 3 Comments

When it comes to choosing leaders in the high-tech computer industry, what companies come to mind? Whether you’re a Mac fan or foe, it’s likely that Apple was one of the first technology bigwigs you thought of. Some technology companies view Apple as the Holy Grail—an untouchable monster in the computer industry.

As the president of two high-quality technology firms, I, along with the majority of technology consumers, believe that Apple produces incredible products, arguably some of the best in the world. That’s why we at Ematic are happy to consider Apple a competitor.

Although this positive outlook on a potentially one-sided competition might seem slightly unorthodox and naïve, as a producer of top-of-the-line tablets, we can’t help but be compared to Apple, who created and is currently the leader of the tablet market. In fact, without Apple’s enormous popularity and their initial efforts to make tablets part of mainstream technology, the market would be nowhere close to what it is today. We at Ematic have Apple to thank for introducing tablets to the world and for keeping our product relevant through continued marketing and production efforts.

Of course, as Apple’s competitor, we at Ematic have our work cut out for us when it comes to promoting our tablets and other products. We believe in our product, and we believe that the look, feel, function, and power of our tablets rival these qualities in Apple’s products. Sure, when you purchase an Ematic tablet, you’re not getting the Apple name, but you are getting a highly competitive and similar product for a fraction of the cost. All of the features you love at half the price: what could be better?

We want our consumers—and Apple’s consumers—to ask themselves this question. Because our products are on par with Apple’s, consumers must decide if they’re seeking an innovative and powerful electronic device, or simply the Apple brand. To drive home the comparison, I like to use the example of a BMW and a Ferrari. The Ferrari is a lot fancier and a lot more expensive than a BMW, but a BMW is still a luxury car and will still get you where you need to go without sacrificing comfort and performance. Sure, when you put a Ferrari and a BMW next to each other, it’s easy to spot the “high-performance” machine, but are you really sacrificing anything by choosing the BMW? No. In fact, you’re getting more bang for your buck, as well as a product that will most likely get you where you need to go for a longer period of time (with fewer tune-ups).

In the end, it all depends on what our consumers desire—a well-known brand or a well-executed product. Our faith in the success of our product is just one reason why instead of being intimated by Apple’s competition, we’re thankful for it. We believe the opportunity to market head-to-head with the industry’s leader works favorably in Ematic’s favor, and we only hope that this competitive edge continues to build as Ematic grows to become a mainstream name in the world of computer technology.

Roy Rayn is the president of Ematic, a consumer electronics company that provides superior technology at a fraction of the cost.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/jimmyye0h Jimmy Yeoh

    The BMW and Ferrari comparison is inadequate and out of context. Both are luxury and status-defining objects, but they are definitely incomparable and are of completely different leagues.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jimmyye0h Jimmy Yeoh

    The BMW and Ferrari comparison is inadequate and out of context. Both are luxury and status-defining objects, but they are definitely incomparable and are of completely different leagues.