EntrepreneurI remember the exact moment when I became an entrepreneur.  I twelve years old and driving with my father from Rochester, New York (my hometown), to Toronto.  As we were entering the city, like in many large cities, one will see a lot of industry and large office buildings on the highway.

I thought to myself, “What are all of these businesses?  What do they do?  Who runs these companies.” Something then clicked for me.  These businesses were all started by one person, or a small group of people.  The ideas were curated on someone’s couch, in a bar, coffee shop, or while laying in bed counting sheep, as one wonders how they will bring their family the next meal.

I knew at that very moment that I wanted to be one of these people.  My mind has always worked in a very interesting way.  Bouncing around from one idea to the next, always thinking about many things.  But mostly about business.

Since that very moment in the car, I have thought of countless business concepts.  Each and every time I research the market, ask experts, question potential consumers.  More often than not, I simply learn about an industry which I will not get into at that time.  I have started many businesses, some successful and some not.  But over the years I have realized something very important.

The business of starting one on your own, or as one would say “entrepreneurship,” is lonely as hell!

There are constantly programs popping up in business schools across the road teaching students to be entrepreneurs.  Government officials and leaders are always talking about how we need more entrepreneurs in our society.

I’ve got news for you.  Entrepreneurship is not learned in my opinion.  It is something one is born with, something that runs deep in our veins.

I find great value in talking to people smarter and more experienced than me.  I am very proud of my arsenal of mentors that I have collected over the years.  They shape who I am, help me make decisions and are always interested in ensuring my success.

They all tell me they are lonely, at least the entrepreneurs do.

No one cares about the decisions you make, the bottom line is all up to you.  Each person that you employ’s livelihood is dependent on those decisions.

I have had a hard time coming to terms with this feeling of loneliness.  I have spent many sleepless nights and shed countless tears over this realization.  It finally began to make sense to me.

love to be alone.

Some of my best times are spent by myself, in my car.  I love to take long trips throughout the country when I spend time thinking, listening to music, and thinking about my life and my place in the world.

I find myself sitting by myself at bars, coffee shops, in parks, and at parties.  I like to observe and I love to listen.  I make all of my own decisions, which seem to not be the consensus in the circles I roll with.

I love being on my own in business.  I love being the boss, the authority, the one whom others rely on, the man who makes every single decision.

I say entrepreneurship is a blessing and a curse.  I would not change it for anything, but I would also not wish it upon anyone.

I am an entrepreneur, and I couldn’t be more proud.

I say “Go to the Great Wall of China.  This is what you will believe:  Anything is possible!”

Jeremy W. Crane is a serial entrepreneur from Rochester, New York and attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison for undergrad.  He is currently working on growing the parking business in Rochester, New York both domestically and abroad, as well as starting an E-commerce/flash sale business.  He is most passionate about his good friends and family, especially his brothers Dan and Ari.

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