You May Not Need To Go Corporate If... : Under30CEO You May Not Need To Go Corporate If... : Under30CEO
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Don’t Go Corporate If…

| August 7, 2009 | 8 Comments

corporate_whoreTrying to decide if you can make a break from the herd? Here’s what I’ve been able to prune down the make or break characteristics of a self-employed entrepreneur to:

#1 Altruism appeals to you.

You like helping people? You like making things better? Well, congratulations! That’s the core of all business, and you’re already well on your way to making things happen.

#2 You are curious.

Whatever you’re passionate about, whatever industry you fit into, there’s a lot — a TON — of information you need to learn. Thinking of any new industry, you need to ask yourself:

Who’s involved? What do they do? What DON’T they do? What do they want? What do their customers want? What are they not giving their customers? Where is it going?

Try to frame your questions simply, and your answers in as broad of strokes as possible. You don’t want to accidentally box your thoughts into whatever is in your head at the moment. Use lateral thinking to help some seriously new ideas break to the surface.

With altruism and curiosity, you’re pretty much in the clear to make a living as a self-employed small business owner. You may not lead the future of tomorrow, but at least you can make a good living according to your own plan.

#3 You see where the future is going

Do you ever think “God, I wish this website did ____” only to find that a few months later, it does? Have you found yourself oddly satisfied after seeing a new store open in your town, because you’ve always known that it needed that kind of store?

Superb. You have vision. You may just be an entrepreneur.

This means you’re able to not only think about what the world is like today, but what it could be like tomorrow. Steve Jobs (Apple) and Edwin Land (Polaroid) both said that they didn’t invent anything. The products they made “always existed,” they each say, “I was just the first to discover it.” They could see a better solution, and were just able to make it a reality. Now it’s your turn.

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So… If you like to make the world better, like to investigate and have intuition, you could probably do quite well on your own.

Unsure how to go for it / get started? Ask me in a comment and I’ll try to help you out.

And remember, if all three of these don’t apply to you, you are screwed. just have something to work on, now. It’s really not that tough, so stick it out!

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Category: Personal Branding, Startup Advice

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  • smcguinness

    I'm finalizing a “moonlighting” project of mine. Hardest part is getting incorporated. I've read a bunch about it, but I'm still unsure. I'm about 99% sure I need an LLC, but that 1% makes me worry enough to not go ahead and start an LLC, but finding the answer to that to become 100% has escaped me. And I don't quite have the $1000 it would cost for state fees+lawyer costs+misc.

  • http://Under30CEO.com Jared O'Toole

    An LLC is probably a great move for your company. It will be about $1000 probably can be done cheaper through online sites like legalzoom…knocks it back to 600-800 i think, depends on state. Also nothing is set in stone forever and if trying to find the answer to that last %1 is the only thing holding you back then you just have to go for it. Its very rare that any of your moves as an entrepreneur will involve a decision that you are %100 certain of. Shoot me an email Jared(at)under30ceo.com if you want to talk about any of it further.

  • http://twitter.com/jfeldstein jfeldstein

    I've yet to incorporate any of my ventures. Genrally you can run them as a sole proprietorship or S. Corporation which can both be declared without any fee's lawyers or permission from the state. Very informal.

    Once you feel like your business is taking off, and you'd rather the legal and civil protection of incorporation (or whatever you want from it) you can always incorporate later down the line once you have revenue to pay for it.

  • http://under30ceo.com MattWilsontv

    Incorporation will give you a barrier of legal protection from both debt and liability with your venture. We can put out a request on http://helpanentrepreneur.com if you'd like. I'd also try tweeting your legal questions with the hashtag #law and #legal. There should be some smart lawyers monitoring this trying to build their expertise.

  • http://under30ceo.com MattWilsontv

    Incorporation will give you a barrier of legal protection from both debt and liability with your venture. We can put out a request on http://helpanentrepreneur.com if you'd like. I'd also try tweeting your legal questions with the hashtag #law and #legal. There should be some smart lawyers monitoring this trying to build their expertise.

  • http://under30ceo.com MattWilsontv

    Incorporation will give you a barrier of legal protection from both debt and liability with your venture. We can put out a request on http://helpanentrepreneur.com if you'd like. I'd also try tweeting your legal questions with the hashtag #law and #legal. There should be some smart lawyers monitoring this trying to build their expertise.